The Way online sale popular of Zen sale

The Way online sale popular of Zen sale

The Way online sale popular of Zen sale
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In his definitive introduction to Zen Buddhism, Alan Watts ("the perfect guide for a course correction in life" —Deepak Chopra), explains the principles and practices of this ancient religion.

With a rare combination of freshness and lucidity, he delves into the origins and history of Zen to explain what it means for the world today with incredible clarity. Watts saw Zen as “one of the most precious gifts of Asia to the world,” and in The Way of Zen he gives this gift to readers everywhere.

“Perhaps the foremost interpreter of Eastern disciplines for the contemporary West, Watts had the rare gift of ‘writing beautifully the unwritable.’”
Los Angeles Times

Amazon.com Review

After D.T. Suzuki, Alan Watts stands as the godfather of Zen in America. Often taken to task for inspiring the flimsy spontaneity of Beat Zen, Watts had an undeniably keen understanding of his subject. Nowhere is this more evident than in his 1957 classic The Way of Zen, which has been reissued. Watts takes the reader back to the philosophical foundations of Zen in the conceptual world of Hinduism, follows Buddhism''s course through the development of the early Mahayana school, the birth of Zen from Buddhism''s marriage with Chinese Taoism, and on to Zen''s unique expression in Japanese art and life. As a Westerner, Watts anticipates the stumbling blocks encountered with such concepts as emptiness and no-mind, then illustrates with flawlessly apt examples. Many popular books have been written on Zen since Watts'' time, but few have been able to muster the rare combination of erudition and clarity that have kept The Way of Zen in readers'' hands decade after decade. -- Brian Bruya

Review

“Perhaps the foremost interpreter of Eastern disciplines for the contemporary West, Watts had the rare gift of ‘writing beautifully the unwritable.’”
Los Angeles Times

About the Author

Alan W. Watts, who held both a master’s degree in theology and a doctorate of divinity, is best remembered as an interpreter of Zen Buddhism in particular, and of Indian and Chinese philosophy in general. Standing apart, however, from sectarian membership, he has earned the reputation of being one of the most original and “unrutted” philosophers of the twentieth century. Watts was the author of some twenty books on the philosophy and psychology of religion that have been published in many languages throughout the world, including the bestselling  The Way of Zen. An avid lecturer, Watts appeared regularly on the radio and hosted the popular television series,  Eastern Wisdom and Modern Life,in the 1960s. He died in 1973.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

w de paz
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
problem with kindle edition
Reviewed in the United States on September 10, 2018
This is a seminal work and a great intro to taoism, zen and everything in between and who better to explain it so clearly than Mr. Watts. But stay away from the kindle edition. Half way through the book it starts skipping pages (you can see the page number skipping, not... See more
This is a seminal work and a great intro to taoism, zen and everything in between and who better to explain it so clearly than Mr. Watts. But stay away from the kindle edition. Half way through the book it starts skipping pages (you can see the page number skipping, not just the obvious text jumps), sections of pages repeating, and text skipping (not page numbers skip but jumps in the text between pages where you don''t know if it dropped a line or how many paragraphs). it seems that no one took the time to proof read it in an actual kindle device.

just buy the printed version and enjoy the feel and smell of paper and ink.
62 people found this helpful
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Bryan DesmondTop Contributor: Dragon Ball Z (TV Show)
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
''...Zen is a liberation from time.''
Reviewed in the United States on April 3, 2020
I have finally read one of Alan''s books! I''m a big fan of Watts, and have listened to lots of his lectures and audiobooks but have never sat down to read his words rather than listen to them. Even switching formats I couldn''t help but read it in Alan''s voice. I think I... See more
I have finally read one of Alan''s books! I''m a big fan of Watts, and have listened to lots of his lectures and audiobooks but have never sat down to read his words rather than listen to them. Even switching formats I couldn''t help but read it in Alan''s voice. I think I picked a good one to start with too, seeing as how packed with information it is. I think half of it would have passed me by had I tried to listen to it instead. And the thing is that as dense as it is it''s rich, and to me endlessly interesting material. This was the kind of book that I found myself highlighting or notating nearly every other page, and I know that revisiting those highlights will be something I do quite often. Not all of it was entirely new material for me, but it''s presented and discussed in that inimitably ''Alan Watts'' way that offers a clear perspective. And for a book published in 1957 it holds up remarkably well. Zen is--after all--a ''liberation from time''.

Anyone interested in the history and development of Zen practice (through it''s roots in Taoism and Buddhism) as well as its principles and practice (in natural life and in the arts) should look no further than Alan''s book. He presents ideas that are as frustrating as they are revelatory. The kind of ideas that you must not grasp to grasp. Ones that are grown of spontaneity rather than created by trying. It''s fun to think about, fun to read, and offers plenty for an eventual reread as well. I loved it.

''Awakening almost necessarily involves a sense of relief because it brings to an end the habitual psychological cramp of trying to grasp the mind with the mind, which in turn generates the ego with all its conflicts and defenses. In time, the sense of relief wears off–but not the awakening, unless one has confused it with the sense of relief and has attempted to exploit it by indulging in ecstasy. Awakening is thus only incidentally pleasant or ecstatic, only at first an experience of intense emotional release. But in itself it is just the ending of an artificial and absurd use of the mind.''
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Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It is wonderfully readable without ever glossing over the complexity and profundity ...
Reviewed in the United States on April 8, 2017
Of those available in English, this is still the outstanding combination of introduction, history and guide to Buddhism. What makes it so memorable - and yes, inspiring - are the elegance and clarity of the writing, the depth of scholarship and breadth of coverage. It is... See more
Of those available in English, this is still the outstanding combination of introduction, history and guide to Buddhism. What makes it so memorable - and yes, inspiring - are the elegance and clarity of the writing, the depth of scholarship and breadth of coverage. It is wonderfully readable without ever glossing over the complexity and profundity of the ideas presented or the historical, cultural and linguistic challenges of interpretation and translation. This is a remarkable achievement. One gets the feeling that Alan Watts understood his readership as well as he understood what he was writing about. He was in effect writing for and about both. Highly recommended
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BL
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This book is BRILLIANT. It is a great overview of Zen Buddhism ...
Reviewed in the United States on January 15, 2018
This book is BRILLIANT. It is a great overview of Zen Buddhism in the large context of Indian and Mahayana Buddhism and his insights and great writing will keep you spellbound until the end of the book. I wish I had read this years ago. This is one of a handful of great... See more
This book is BRILLIANT. It is a great overview of Zen Buddhism in the large context of Indian and Mahayana Buddhism and his insights and great writing will keep you spellbound until the end of the book. I wish I had read this years ago. This is one of a handful of great books on Buddhism (The Heart of the Buddha''s Teaching by Hahn is another), and Mr. Watts has great skill in characterizing complex ideas in a simply way that will act like a koan on the reader. A powerful book that merits several reads. Highly recommended.
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Larry J. Babin
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The answers that most Translators of Buddhism Omit forgetting that giving meaning is the intent.
Reviewed in the United States on February 21, 2021
I found that going directly to Part Two labeled Principles and Practice to be the most expedient means of illuminating Buddhism and Zen. This a powerful book and provides a direct pointing to the questions most have on the subject of the objective of Buddhist and Zen... See more
I found that going directly to Part Two labeled Principles and Practice to be the most expedient means of illuminating Buddhism and Zen. This a powerful book and provides a direct pointing to the questions most have on the subject of the objective of Buddhist and Zen enlightenment. One must remember that the primary objective of both is the reduction of suffering in this life and freedom to enjoy life as it is. Alan points to the fact there is nothing metaphysical or mysterious about the practice and the goal. One must not forget that the points of enlightenment are not new. All since time began discuss the world of things as opposed to world of no things, The void, Form and Emptiness, Yin and Yang, Prusha and Maya, etc, etc. Each on the surface appears different but upon close examination are not just similar but exactly the same about Knowing, Not Knowing, Ignorance and Bliss. As Spinoza wrote is all comes in waves which at the zenith begins the collapse upon itself and dissolves back into the the sea of unknowing and unknown. Statistics point directly at the beginning of the collapse as day one with the large part of the population in ignorance populating the planet at an ever increasing rate.l
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JGar
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Difficult Subject
Reviewed in the United States on November 18, 2018
Eastern religion is very difficult for the Western mind to understand. Alan Watts explains the history of Chinese Taoism and Indian Buddhism to provide context for Zen Buddhism, but I do not feel that he did a good job explaining Buddhism''s history, philosophy, or... See more
Eastern religion is very difficult for the Western mind to understand. Alan Watts explains the history of Chinese Taoism and Indian Buddhism to provide context for Zen Buddhism, but I do not feel that he did a good job explaining Buddhism''s history, philosophy, or theology.

Trying to explain Zen in particular is arguably much more difficult than trying to explain Buddhism in general. However, Alan Watts managed to convey Zen in a way I could grasp. I would guess Zen can never be truly understood, but at least now I know what Zen is, how it differs from mainstream Buddhism, and how much it has influenced Japanese and Chinese culture.
12 people found this helpful
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Jacob Benary
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
If zen could be explained
Reviewed in the United States on September 22, 2018
The task of exlaning something unfathomable as Zen is impossible and Alan Watts does that exactly. I found the book facsinating, the story of what is Zen and the history of all different schools is told with an inspiring voice. I recommend this book to those who are in a... See more
The task of exlaning something unfathomable as Zen is impossible and Alan Watts does that exactly. I found the book facsinating, the story of what is Zen and the history of all different schools is told with an inspiring voice. I recommend this book to those who are in a hurry, to those who want to accomplish goals and look at the future as the purpose of life.
15 people found this helpful
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mark nelson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
in depth study of otherwise elusive topic
Reviewed in the United States on May 6, 2019
Alan Watts gives westerners a comprehensive explanation of a topic that lends itself to being very unclear. I read DT Suzuki, Robert Blythe and could not figure out what the were talking about. One hand clapping?! This book is very clear but retains the respect and... See more
Alan Watts gives westerners a comprehensive explanation of a topic that lends itself to being very unclear. I read DT Suzuki, Robert Blythe and could not figure out what the were talking about. One hand clapping?! This book is very clear but retains the respect and perspective that a study of NOW requires. zen is a method of enlightenment.
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Top reviews from other countries

brymor
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Zen and the Art of Buddhahood
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 3, 2015
I wanted to read this book to see how a counter-culture guru such as Watts would explain Zen to a Westerner, and was glad I did so. Not all the chapters are equally readable: the dissertation on Tao is excellent, and he makes a good shot at explaining Zen concepts such as...See more
I wanted to read this book to see how a counter-culture guru such as Watts would explain Zen to a Westerner, and was glad I did so. Not all the chapters are equally readable: the dissertation on Tao is excellent, and he makes a good shot at explaining Zen concepts such as "no mind" and "no thought". He keeps repeating that Westerners find Zen thought baffling, but his explanations for why this is are not altogether convincing. This is possibly because he believes that in the West we think serially, using language (in our heads), rather than adopting the more holistic thought processes of the East. This view of Western thought is now rather dated - we all think holistically - so in fact Zen is closer to Western thought than he claims. Also he struggles to clarify Zen morality. There is a sense in which the "no thought" approach evades morality entirely, which he tells us, but he does not go on to address the issue of how Zen adherents can commit violent and savage acts (the Samurai etc) with equanimity: No thought can equal No responsibility. Nevertheless, Watts does succeed in presenting a complex subject to Western readers, in a book peppered with insightful observations. Here are just three: "the Mahayana is not so much a theoretical and speculative construction as an account of an inner experience." "It [Zen] does not confuse spirituality with thinking about God while one is peeling potatoes. Zen spirituality is just to peel the potatoes." "one does not practice Zen to become a Buddha; one practices it because one is a Buddha from the beginning–and this “original realization” is the starting point of the Zen life."
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adrian gorman
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Alan Watts my Guru
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 14, 2019
Quite simply the book that changed my life. There is so much in this its incredible. One that must be read several times to even begin to take in the sheer breadth of information. A vital guide in anyone''s spiritual journey to discover the truth of things.
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Nic
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Difficult concepts accessible
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 29, 2017
In spite of its age this book has been hailed as one of the best at explaining Zen to western minds that find some of the tenets of eastern philosophy hard to grasp. It is true that they are still hard to take in, but this book provides the clearest guide I have come...See more
In spite of its age this book has been hailed as one of the best at explaining Zen to western minds that find some of the tenets of eastern philosophy hard to grasp. It is true that they are still hard to take in, but this book provides the clearest guide I have come across. The writing style is accessible and the explanations clear (though that doesn''t mean they are universally easy to get a grip on). This is the book for anyone interested in achieving a greater level of understanding of Buddhism and Zen in particular.
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D. J. B. James
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Heavy going
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 30, 2021
I found with this book as I find with a lot of Alan Watt''s stuff, is that you wind up feeling liturgically constipated after an hour or so and have to put it down. Somehow he manages to get so drowned in detail and depth that it makes the work unenjoyable, being so stuffed...See more
I found with this book as I find with a lot of Alan Watt''s stuff, is that you wind up feeling liturgically constipated after an hour or so and have to put it down. Somehow he manages to get so drowned in detail and depth that it makes the work unenjoyable, being so stuffed with data that it''s just not digestible. The book, for me, is good in parts, but I''d find it hard to recommend as the Way of Zen. Rather it''s a hefty discourse on every nook and cranny that led to its development. These pages are littered by half a hundred luminaries you''ve never heard of before and are unlikely to hear of again, not unless you''re doing a PhD in Chinese adventurists into the proto-esoteric world, even then they emerge sounding like a lot of bickering and petulant old point-scorers rather than still and smiling sages. I don''t mean to slate Watts, I admire him a great deal, he had a formidable intellect but this, like so many of his works winds up with: ''you can''t see the forest for the trees'', to quote him directly.
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Karow Foxx
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Interesting Read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 16, 2020
This book is great for learning about Hinduism, Buddhism and Zen. It feels very different to other books that I have read and is written in quite a unique way. At times it can feel very academic and hard to follow, but other times you will read a bit and it will just make...See more
This book is great for learning about Hinduism, Buddhism and Zen. It feels very different to other books that I have read and is written in quite a unique way. At times it can feel very academic and hard to follow, but other times you will read a bit and it will just make you think differently about certain things. Definitely worth a read.
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The Way online sale popular of Zen sale

The Way online sale popular of Zen sale

The Way online sale popular of Zen sale

The Way online sale popular of Zen sale

The Way online sale popular of Zen sale

The Way online sale popular of Zen sale

The Way online sale popular of Zen sale

The Way online sale popular of Zen sale

The Way online sale popular of Zen sale

The Way online sale popular of Zen sale

The Way online sale popular of Zen sale