The Hunt for Red October (A new arrival Jack Ryan outlet online sale Novel) outlet online sale

The Hunt for Red October (A new arrival Jack Ryan outlet online sale Novel) outlet online sale

The Hunt for Red October (A new arrival Jack Ryan outlet online sale Novel) outlet online sale
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Don''t Miss the Original Series Tom Clancy''s Jack Ryan Starring John Krasinski!

The #1 New York Times bestseller that launched the phenomenal career of Tom Clancy—a gripping military thriller that introduced the world to his unforgettable hero, Jack Ryan—nominated as one of America’s best-loved novels by PBS’s The Great American Read.

 
Somewhere under the freezing Atlantic, a Soviet sub commander has just made a fateful decision. The Red October is heading west. The Americans want her. The Russians want her back. The chase for the highly advanced nuclear submarine is on—and there’s only one man who can find her...
 
Brilliant CIA analyst Jack Ryan has little interest in fieldwork, but when covert photographs of Red October land on his desk, Ryan soon finds himself in the middle of a high-stakes game of hide-and-seek played by two world powers—a game that could end in all-out war.

Review

Praise for The Hunt for Red October

“Flawless...frighteningly genuine.”— The Wall Street Journal

“Remarkable...intricate and nerve tingling.”—Clive Cussler

“Gripping narrative...Navy buffs and thriller adepts have been mesmerized.”— Time

Praise for Tom Clancy

“He constantly taps the current world situation for its imminent dangers and spins them into an engrossing tale.”— The New York Times Book Review

“A brilliant describer of events.”— The Washington Post

“No one can equal his talent for making military electronics and engineering intelligible and exciting...He remains the best!”— Houston Chronicle

About the Author

A little more than thirty years ago Tom Clancy was a Maryland insurance broker with a passion for naval history. Years before, he had been an English major at Baltimore’s Loyola College and had always dreamed of writing a novel. His first effort, The Hunt for Red October—the first of the phenomenally successful Jack Ryan novels—sold briskly as a result of rave reviews, then catapulted onto the New York Times bestseller list after President Reagan pronounced it “the perfect yarn.” From that day forward, Clancy established himself as an undisputed master at blending exceptional realism and authenticity, intricate plotting, and razor-sharp suspense. He passed away in October 2013.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

THE FIRST DAY

FRIDAY, 3 DECEMBER

The Red October

Captain First Rank Marko Ramius of the Soviet Navy was dressed for the Arctic conditions normal to the Northern Fleet submarine base at Polyarnyy. Five layers of wool and oilskin enclosed him. A dirty harbor tug pushed his submarine’s bow around to the north, facing down the channel. The dock that had held his Red October for two interminable months was now a water-filled concrete box, one of the many specially built to shelter strategic missile submarines from the harsh elements. On its edge a collection of sailors and dockyard workers watched his ship sail in stolid Russian fashion, without a wave or a cheer.

“Engines ahead slow, Kamarov,” he ordered. The tug slid out of the way, and Ramius glanced aft to see the water stirring from the force of the twin bronze propellers. The tug’s commander waved. Ramius returned the gesture. The tug had done a simple job, but done it quickly and well. The Red October, a Typhoon-class sub, moved under her own power towards the main ship channel of the Kola Fjord.

“There’s Purga, Captain.” Gregoriy Kamarov pointed to the icebreaker that would escort them to sea. Ramius nodded. The two hours required to transit the channel would tax not his seamanship but his endurance. There was a cold north wind blowing, the only sort of north wind in this part of the world. Late autumn had been surprisingly mild, and scarcely any snow had fallen in an area that measures it in meters; then a week before a major winter storm had savaged the Murmansk coast, breaking pieces off the Arctic icepack. The icebreaker was no formality. The Purga would butt aside any ice that might have drifted overnight into the channel. It would not do at all for the Soviet Navy’s newest missile submarine to be damaged by an errant chunk of frozen water.

The water in the fjord was choppy, driven by the brisk wind. It began to lap over the October’s spherical bow, rolling back down the flat missile deck which lay before the towering black sail. The water was coated with the bilge oil of numberless ships, filth that would not evaporate in the low temperatures and that left a black ring on the rocky walls of the fjord as though from the bath of a slovenly giant. An altogether apt simile, Ramius thought. The Soviet giant cared little for the dirt it left on the face of the earth, he grumbled to himself. He had learned his seamanship as a boy on inshore fishing boats, and knew what it was to be in harmony with nature.

“Increase speed to one-third,” he said. Kamarov repeated his captain’s order over the bridge telephone. The water stirred more as the October moved astern of the Purga. Captain Lieutenant Kamarov was the ship’s navigator, his last duty station having been harbor pilot for the large combatant vessels based on both sides of the wide inlet. The two officers kept a weather eye on the armed icebreaker three hundred meters ahead. The Purga’s after deck had a handful of crewmen stomping about in the cold, one wearing the white apron of a ship’s cook. They wanted to witness the Red October’s first operational cruise, and besides, sailors will do almost anything to break the monotony of their duties.

Ordinarily it would have irritated Ramius to have his ship escorted out—the channel here was wide and deep—but not today. The ice was something to worry about. And so, for Ramius, was a great deal else.

“So, my Captain, again we go to sea to serve and protect the Rodina!” Captain Second Rank Ivan Yurievich Putin poked his head through the hatch—without permission, as usual—and clambered up the ladder with the awkwardness of a landsman. The tiny control station was already crowded enough with the captain, the navigator, and a mute lookout. Putin was the ship’s zampolit (political officer). Everything he did was to serve the Rodina (Motherland), a word that had mystical connotations to a Russian and, along with V. I. Lenin, was the Communist party’s substitute for a godhead.

“Indeed, Ivan,” Ramius replied with more good cheer than he felt. “Two weeks at sea. It is good to leave the dock. A seaman belongs at sea, not tied alongside, overrun with bureaucrats and workmen with dirty boots. And we will be warm.”

“You find this cold?” Putin asked incredulously.

For the hundredth time Ramius told himself that Putin was the perfect political officer. His voice was always too loud, his humor too affected. He never allowed a person to forget what he was. The perfect political officer, Putin was an easy man to fear.

“I have been in submarines too long, my friend. I grow accustomed to moderate temperatures and a stable deck under my feet.” Putin did not notice the veiled insult. He’d been assigned to submarines after his first tour on destroyers had been cut short by chronic seasickness—and perhaps because he did not resent the close confinement aboard submarines, something that many men cannot tolerate.

“Ah, Marko Aleksandrovich, in Gorkiy on a day like this, flowers bloom!”

“And what sort of flowers might those be, Comrade Political Officer?” Ramius surveyed the fjord through his binoculars. At noon the sun was barely over the southeast horizon, casting orange light and purple shadows along the rocky walls.

“Why, snow flowers, of course,” Putin said, laughing loudly. “On a day like this the faces of the children and the women glow pink, your breath trails behind you like a cloud, and the vodka tastes especially fine. Ah, to be in Gorkiy on a day like this!”

The bastard ought to work for Intourist, Ramius told himself, except that Gorkiy is a city closed to foreigners. He had been there twice. It had struck him as a typical Soviet city, full of ramshackle buildings, dirty streets, and ill-clad citizens. As it was in most Russian cities, winter was Gorkiy’s best season. The snow hid all the dirt. Ramius, half Lithuanian, had childhood memories of a better place, a coastal village whose Hanseatic origin had left rows of presentable buildings.

It was unusual for anyone other than a Great Russian to be aboard—much less command—a Soviet naval vessel. Marko’s father, Aleksandr Ramius, had been a hero of the Party, a dedicated, believing Communist who had served Stalin faithfully and well. When the Soviets first occupied Lithuania in 1940, the elder Ramius was instrumental in rounding up political dissidents, shop owners, priests, and anyone else who might have been troublesome to the new regime. All were shipped off to fates that now even Moscow could only guess at. When the Germans invaded a year later, Aleksandr fought heroically as a political commissar, and was later to distinguish himself in the Battle of Leningrad. In 1944 he returned to his native land with the spearhead of the Eleventh Guards Army to wreak bloody vengeance on those who had collaborated with the Germans or been suspected of such. Marko’s father had been a true Soviet hero—and Marko was deeply ashamed to be his son. His mother’s health had been broken during the endless siege of Leningrad. She died giving birth to him, and he was raised by his paternal grandmother in Lithuania while his father strutted through the Party Central Committee in Vilnius, awaiting his promotion to Moscow. He got that, too, and was a candidate member of the Politburo when his life was cut short by a heart attack.

Marko’s shame was not total. His father’s prominence had made his current goal a possibility, and Marko planned to wreak his own vengeance on the Soviet Union, enough, perhaps, to satisfy the thousands of his countrymen who had died before he was even born.

“Where we are going, Ivan Yurievich, it will be colder still.”

Putin clapped his captain’s shoulder. Was his affection feigned or real? Marko wondered. Probably real. Ramius was an honest man, and he recognized that this short, loud oaf did have some human feelings.

“Why is it, Comrade Captain, that you always seem glad to leave the Rodina and go to sea?”

Ramius smiled behind his binoculars. “A seaman has one country, Ivan Yurievich, but two wives. You never understand that. Now I go to my other wife, the cold, heartless one that owns my soul.” Ramius paused. The smile vanished. “My only wife, now.”

Putin was quiet for once, Marko noted. The political officer had been there, had cried real tears as the coffin of polished pine rolled into the cremation chamber. For Putin the death of Natalia Bogdanova Ramius had been a cause of grief, but beyond that the act of an uncaring God whose existence he regularly denied. For Ramius it had been a crime committed not by God but the State. An unnecessary, monstrous crime, one that demanded punishment.

“Ice.” The lookout pointed.

“Loose-pack ice, starboard side of the channel, or perhaps something calved off the east-side glacier. We’ll pass well clear,” Kamarov said.

“Captain!” The bridge speaker had a metallic voice. “Message from fleet headquarters.”

“Read it.”

“‘Exercise area clear. No enemy vessels in vicinity. Proceed as per orders. Signed, Korov, Fleet Commander.’”

“Acknowledged,” Ramius said. The speaker clicked off. “So, no Amerikantsi about?”

“You doubt the fleet commander?” Putin inquired.

“I hope he is correct,” Ramius replied, more sincerely than his political officer would appreciate. “But you remember our briefings.”

Putin shifted on his feet. Perhaps he was feeling the cold.

“Those American 688-class submarines, Ivan, the Los Angeleses. Remember what one of their officers told our spy? That they could sneak up on a whale and bugger it before it knew they were there? I wonder how the KGB got that bit of information. A beautiful Soviet agent, trained in the ways of the decadent West, too skinny, the way the imperialists like their women, blond hair…” The captain grunted amusement. “Probably the American officer was a boastful boy, trying to find a way to do something similar to our agent, no? And feeling his liquor, like most sailors. Still. The American Los Angeles class, and the new British Trafalgars, those we must guard against. They are a threat to us.”

“The Americans are good technicians, Comrade Captain,” Putin said, “but they are not giants. Their technology is not so awesome. Nasha lutcha,” he concluded. Ours is better.

Ramius nodded thoughtfully, thinking to himself that zampoliti really ought to know something about the ships they supervised, as mandated by Party doctrine.

“Ivan, didn’t the farmers around Gorkiy tell you it is the wolf you do not see that you must fear? But don’t be overly concerned. With this ship we will teach them a lesson, I think.”

“As I told the Main Political Administration,” Putin clapped Ramius’ shoulder again, “Red October is in the best of hands!”

Ramius and Kamarov both smiled at that. You son of a bitch! the captain thought, saying in front of my men that you must pass on my fitness to command! A man who could not command a rubber raft on a calm day! A pity you will not live to eat those words, Comrade Political Officer, and spend the rest of your life in the gulag for that misjudgment. It would almost be worth leaving you alive.

A few minutes later the chop began to pick up, making the submarine roll. The movement was accentuated by their height above the deck, and Putin made excuses to go below. Still a weak-legged sailor. Ramius shared the observation silently with Kamarov, who smiled agreement. Their unspoken contempt for the zampolit was a most un-Soviet thought.

The next hour passed quickly. The water grew rougher as they approached the open sea, and their icebreaker escort began to wallow on the swells. Ramius watched her with interest. He had never been on an icebreaker, his entire career having been in submarines. They were more comfortable, but also more dangerous. He was accustomed to the danger, though, and the years of experience would stand him in good stead now.

“Sea buoy in sight, Captain.” Kamarov pointed. The red lighted buoy was riding actively on the waves.

“Control room, what is the sounding?” Ramius asked over the bridge telephone.

“One hundred meters below the keel, Comrade Captain.”

“Increase speed to two-thirds, come left ten degrees.” Ramius looked at Kamarov. “Signal our course change to Purga, and hope he doesn’t turn the wrong way.”

Kamarov reached for the small blinker light stowed under the bridge coaming. The Red October began to accelerate slowly, her 30,000-ton bulk resisting the power of her engines. Presently the bow wave grew to a three-meter standing arc of water; man-made combers rolled down the missile deck, splitting against the front of the sail. The Purga altered course to starboard, allowing the submarine to pass well clear.

Ramius looked aft at the bluffs of the Kola Fjord. They had been carved to this shape millennia before by the remorseless pressure of towering glaciers. How many times in his twenty years of service with the Red Banner Northern Fleet had he looked at the wide, flat U-shape? This would be the last. One way or another, he’d never go back. Which way would it turn out? Ramius admitted to himself that he didn’t much care. Perhaps the stories his grandmother had taught him were true, about God and the reward for a good life. He hoped so—it would be good if Natalia were not truly dead. In any case, there was no turning back. He had left a letter in the last mailbag taken off before sailing. There was no going back after that.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
4,770 global ratings

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Top reviews from the United States

Mike
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
1 star for Kindle version (for a 5 star story)
Reviewed in the United States on October 16, 2018
One of my favorite all-time books. Picked up the e-book version to give it a re-read, and am shocked at the poor quality. The book is littered with conversion errors - every page is marred with words that run together without spaces, and there are missing partial and... See more
One of my favorite all-time books. Picked up the e-book version to give it a re-read, and am shocked at the poor quality. The book is littered with conversion errors - every page is marred with words that run together without spaces, and there are missing partial and complete sentences in many chapters. A *simple spellcheck* would have caught most of these errors! This is a major blockbuster title that started what I assume is a very lucrative franchise, with a new Amazon TV series for the book''s protagonist, and they can''t even bother to proofread the e-copy of the book that started it all?! Words fail me (but not nearly as badly as Penguin Group failed!).
59 people found this helpful
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Ralph W.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Classic Clancy
Reviewed in the United States on November 20, 2017
I was fully prepared not to be particularly impressed with this book, even though I have enjoyed watching the movie numerous times over the years. After all, when Clancy wrote it he was still selling insurance in Owings, Maryland. What could he possibly know about... See more
I was fully prepared not to be particularly impressed with this book, even though I have enjoyed watching the movie numerous times over the years. After all, when Clancy wrote it he was still selling insurance in Owings, Maryland. What could he possibly know about submarines?

I was very pleasantly surprised. The Hunt for Red October is a superbly crafted novel. The characters are well drawn and credible, plot is satisfyingly convoluted, and the density of technical detail provides the authenticity that one expects in a top rank technothriller.

For my taste, technothrillers don''t get any better than this (and it was Clancy''s first!). Engaging characters, great plot, well-realized setting, heart-pounding suspense all the way to the last few pages.

Highly recommended.
66 people found this helpful
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George P. Wood
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Novel that Made Clancy''s Reputation (and It''s Better than the Movie!)
Reviewed in the United States on March 9, 2021
I have read every Jack Ryan novel Tom Clancy ever wrote. At least I thought I had until I decided to re-read The Hunt for Red October. It turns out I had confused the movie with the book, so my re-read turned into a first read. In the story, a Russian nuclear... See more
I have read every Jack Ryan novel Tom Clancy ever wrote. At least I thought I had until I decided to re-read The Hunt for Red October. It turns out I had confused the movie with the book, so my re-read turned into a first read.

In the story, a Russian nuclear submarine—the titular Red October—goes missing, the motive of Marko Ramius (its captain) unclear. The Soviet Navy launches every ship it has in its Atlantic feet, on the surface or under it, with orders to find and destroy the sub. But why?

That massive deployment catches the attention of Washington DC, for the Soviet boats are headed toward American coastal waters. CIA analyst Jack Ryan thinks he knows the reason why. Together with his bosses, he sets up an audacious plan to intervene and … well, if you haven’t seen the movie or read the book, I don’t want to give away the ending.

As is almost always the case, the book is better than the movie. Like later Clancy novels, the plot is labyrinthine. It is told by an omniscient narrator who jumps in and out scenes, unfolding the mystery one turn at a time. No wonder the movie simplified some of the plot lines, characters, and actions.

The Hunt for Red October established Clancy’s reputation as a master of the suspense drama. His novels combine large-scale global forces as the background for individual heroic action. I may not have read Clancy’s first novel back in the day, but looking through his catalogue, I know I read all the others. Clancy’s reputation—not to mention Alec Baldwin’s brilliant performance in the movie—gave me good reasons to do so.

This book is long, but it is nevertheless a page turner, which is my first rule of thumb when evaluating a suspense or mystery novel. Also, it didn’t push the limits of my willing suspension of disbelief, which is my second rule. Despite the wheels-within-wheels plotlines, the book’s main action felt plausible. (If you grew up in the 70s and 80s, you’ll know what I mean when you read it.)

So, five stars to The Hunt for Red October, which celebrates its 37th anniversary this year. It’s a great read, and a fantastic start to a series of novels well worth reading, for a second or third time … or even the first!
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Peter Insabella
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A boring book
Reviewed in the United States on July 6, 2019
I purchased a copy of The Hunt for Red October because it got good reviews from readers and because it was made into a successful movie with Sean Connery. As I read the novel, I was overwhelmed with all the technical detail about submarine operations. I felt as though the... See more
I purchased a copy of The Hunt for Red October because it got good reviews from readers and because it was made into a successful movie with Sean Connery. As I read the novel, I was overwhelmed with all the technical detail about submarine operations. I felt as though the author had to establish his credentials as someone who knew about all this stuff, but I just didn''t care about all that technical detail. I kept looking for a good story to emerge, but the story was always secondary to the technical detail. It felt like Clancy was showing off....."Look how much I know about all this military stuff..." The book became a chore to read, and halfway through I just chucked it aside and found another book with a plot that wasn''t so convoluted. Read this book if you must; I found it boring.
21 people found this helpful
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G. Tanner
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
20% Good Story and 80% Useless Technical Jargon that weakens the plot and character development
Reviewed in the United States on February 18, 2019
There is a good story inside this book. However, the plot is buried deep under wave after wave of unnecessary technical explanation that does not enhance any plot or character development. I get the impression that Clancy spent a lot of time researching this book to make it... See more
There is a good story inside this book. However, the plot is buried deep under wave after wave of unnecessary technical explanation that does not enhance any plot or character development. I get the impression that Clancy spent a lot of time researching this book to make it accurate, but along the way he forgot to research how to pace a decent plot. Also, the main characters are great, but too many minor characters have inexplicably long back stories that also detract from the story. Overall, the underlying story is great, but you have to work your way through too much technical mumbo jumbo and pointless character details to get there. If you want to read a book about technical specifications on things like submarines and super computers from the early 1980s then there’s still probably better books than this one. I was very excited to read this book, but was generally disappointed in it.
16 people found this helpful
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A. Lee
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
more detailed, different pace than the movie
Reviewed in the United States on September 12, 2018
The movie version of The Hunt for Red October is one of my favorite movies. I never read the book till now when Amazon offered the kindle version for a good price. So I thought I''d give it a try and see how the original novel was changed when converted into a movie. The... See more
The movie version of The Hunt for Red October is one of my favorite movies. I never read the book till now when Amazon offered the kindle version for a good price. So I thought I''d give it a try and see how the original novel was changed when converted into a movie. The pace was slower since you have to fit a movie into 90-120 minutes. The movie combined some of the action again to compress it all so I was taken by surprise when certain things didn''t happen as in the movie. The book presents much more in terms of things like how Russian submarine crews differed from the American ones which I appreciated. It also provided info on the difference in the technology of the American vs Russian subs. If you never read the book and only saw the movie, it''s worth a read. (It was interesting how in the movie they changed Ryan''s daughter age from 6 to 5 and she wanted her dad to bring home a ''brother'' for her teddy bear Stanley instead of a Barbie doll (in the novel). Visually in the movie it worked better in the end when Jack finally was able to sleep on a plane with the teddy bear sitting in the seat next to him. )
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Sandra Farber
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Still holding my breath
Reviewed in the United States on April 27, 2016
I have to say I saw the movie, Hunt for Red October first. My husband purchased the book for me on a whim. The paperback edition was very thick with small type. Since we were traveling to Florida I decided to purchase the Kindle edition, good choice. At first I thought... See more
I have to say I saw the movie, Hunt for Red October first. My husband purchased the book for me on a whim. The paperback edition was very thick with small type. Since we were traveling to Florida I decided to purchase the Kindle edition, good choice. At first I thought the book was a mirror of the movie, but after awhile I realized it was much better than the movie. Tom Clancy is a wonderful writer and he puts you right into the action. With a good imagination you can view the entire book in 3D! The depth (no pun intended) of the details was astounding. Only one statement the movie added at the end I would have loved to have read, "Mr. Ambassador, you''ve lost another submarine".
34 people found this helpful
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MarkTop Contributor: Star Wars
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It Grew on Me
Reviewed in the United States on March 6, 2019
It took me a few tries to read this book, as it''s written in a different fashion to what I''m accustomed: namely, Clancy threads his narrative through multiple POV characters with clear third person omniscient narration. While expecting this to be a "Jack Ryan novel," as was... See more
It took me a few tries to read this book, as it''s written in a different fashion to what I''m accustomed: namely, Clancy threads his narrative through multiple POV characters with clear third person omniscient narration. While expecting this to be a "Jack Ryan novel," as was advertised, here Ryan is simply one of many significant characters. With the expectation that I''d be reading something hero-centric, like Jack Reacher, I was disappointed, which threw me off initially. Another challenge is Clancy''s flair for didactic writing, often devoting huge sections to explaining the technical working of some machine. This is educational indeed, and I commend Clancy''s knowledge, but if I''m not in the mood for this kind of writing it can make the book rather dry.

I finally developed the momentum to read the book all the way through, and it is intricately plotted with very well-developed characters. The scale of Clancy''s story is immense, and he creates a compelling geopolitical drama that feels as realistic as a season of 24 (a compliment, mind you). From the confines of a Russian submarine to intrigue in the oval office, Clancy effectively evokes all of these diverse environments with skill and authority, as if he were actually a participant in all of the places he uses as his settings (and I''m sure he hasn''t been in all of them).

The result is a book that exudes authority. Clancy is a wise narrator with keen insight into the nature of men and states, and it''s he who is truly the star of the book, rather than Jack Ryan. In that way it''s a "Tom Clancy novel." Upon finishing this one I immediately ordered the next.

A book is only as good as its author, and Clancy seems to know his stuff. Now that I''m used to his style of writing, I confess that I like it, and eagerly look forward to reading Red Storm Rising.
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Top reviews from other countries

Mr Farenheit
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Technical and well researched, but sinks below expectation.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 12, 2020
The first thing that struck me about this novel was the intricacy and attention to detail. Clancy must have put countless hours in to his research and his passion for naval history clearly shows. That said, I felt that as a casual reader this got in the way of the story at...See more
The first thing that struck me about this novel was the intricacy and attention to detail. Clancy must have put countless hours in to his research and his passion for naval history clearly shows. That said, I felt that as a casual reader this got in the way of the story at times. The premise is really good and there parts of the book that are genuinely exciting. My final impression is that the story could have been a gripping page turner if it were less technical and a little shorter. As it was, I felt the book outstayed it''s welcome somewhat and I was a little relieved when it ended. Also, the ''cold war'' pro-America propaganda gets a bit cringey at times, particularly when the Russians seem comically baffled anytime Americans try to describe what freedom is.
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Reviewer19
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Starts well but too technically heavy
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 20, 2020
As a fan of the film and other submarine stories such as Ice Station Zebra, I was looking forward to reading this and was pleased that it had a gripping start. The opening is well researched and even for those like myself who don''t have a great deal of knowledge of the time...See more
As a fan of the film and other submarine stories such as Ice Station Zebra, I was looking forward to reading this and was pleased that it had a gripping start. The opening is well researched and even for those like myself who don''t have a great deal of knowledge of the time it was written in and the Soviet Empire, enough detailed is provided. Unfortunately after a few chapters, the detail becomes too heavy and I found the over description of the sonar equipment off putting. I tried in vain to pick this up several times but found that I couldn''t finish it. A bit disappointing but if you prefer a great level of detail I would recommend this.
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Mr. S. E. Johnson
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Far more enjoyable than trying to learn a new lockdown skill!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 16, 2021
I’m not one of those people that has managed to develop a new skill during the 2020-21 pandemic. I still can’t cook and I’m still rubbish at DIY or indeed any form of housework, which means that my house is still a tip. It doesn’t help in this respect – though of course...See more
I’m not one of those people that has managed to develop a new skill during the 2020-21 pandemic. I still can’t cook and I’m still rubbish at DIY or indeed any form of housework, which means that my house is still a tip. It doesn’t help in this respect – though of course it’s a relief in others – that for the most part, I’ve carried on working. And that when I’m not doing that, it’s far easier and more pleasurable to lose myself in a book than to try and devote my brain to anything. One thing I have managed to do, however, is to have – more or less – kept up with a series of reading challenges since the start of this year. And without the latest challenge to ‘read a book with a month in the title’, I might never have picked this book up. Which would have been a shame, because: wow, it’s thrilling. It was written in 1984, at the tail end of the Cold War, and has since been made into a hugely successful film starring Sean Connery. But just in case, like me, you haven’t seen that, I’ll try not to give the plot away here. I do however have to say that the Red October is a Soviet submarine and perhaps the most advanced in the world. Her captain is First Rank Marko Ramius, who is widely regarded as one of the most accomplished in the Soviet Navy. Red October makes her first dive on 3rd December, having been briefed to take part in a hunting exercise. But instead, she heads west, towards the United States. A letter sent to the Kremlin, but received only after the submarine has dived, gives the reasons why, and so begins a huge cat and mouse game between American and Russian submarines, warships and aircraft. The Americans want Red October. The Soviet Navy want her back. But she has been designed and built to be undetectable … It says a lot that I not only read this book easily but remained gripped throughout, because it does have a few problems. At 518 pages for the Kindle edition, it really is too long. It goes into an astonishing level of scientific and technical detail which might fascinate you if you already know something about the subject. But since what I know about submarines could probably be written tenfold on the back of a stamp, I should have been completely lost in it. And yet, somehow, I kept on reading. Easily. Then there are some of the actions taken by Ramius – no more spoilers here – which should have left me feeling at best uncomfortable, and at worst hoping that he would be found and caught. But again, somehow, this wasn’t the case. I couldn’t help but silently cheer him on throughout. And as the pace of the book increases as it reaches its captivating climax, one or two of those cheers might just have been vocal. All of which brings me to a simple conclusion. Yes, I could have spent some of my time this week far more productively. But I’m really glad I didn’t, because reading this was far more fun.
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David B
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Highly crafted story with a stack of detail, perhaps at the expense of momentum.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 3, 2021
I saw the film of this book, starring Sean Connery as the Russian sub commander a few years ago. Tom Clancy''s take on things is to include loads of fine detail on the operations, and who is responsible for what in the Navy, which gives a very authentic "feel" to the story,...See more
I saw the film of this book, starring Sean Connery as the Russian sub commander a few years ago. Tom Clancy''s take on things is to include loads of fine detail on the operations, and who is responsible for what in the Navy, which gives a very authentic "feel" to the story, not that I know what would not be authentic! However I do feel all the attention to detail is at the expense of the momentum of the story, and the regular use of Navy-esque makes it hard going. However if you are really into the technical details it''s a great book. Of course the film could not go into the same level of detail, but it ended up being a fantastic action film, and I would add in passing, that only Sean Connery could get away with being a Russian sub commander speaking English with a Scottish accent.
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Simon A. Raymond
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Memory plays tricks
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 18, 2021
Rereading this for 99p via Kindle shows that you don''t always remember accurately the books you read 30+ years ago. Always though that the film followed the book almost word for word, but clearly not. Whilst a rollicking good story, it does now seem very old fashioned....See more
Rereading this for 99p via Kindle shows that you don''t always remember accurately the books you read 30+ years ago. Always though that the film followed the book almost word for word, but clearly not. Whilst a rollicking good story, it does now seem very old fashioned. Could almost be an early 20th century John Buchan novel, with the British/Germans replaced by the USA/Russians. Now seems embarrassingly one sided, you can imagine Donald Trump believing that it was a real story. Loved the fact that the Political Officer on the Red October was called Putin, prescient or what!!
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