Striking Back: popular high quality The 1972 Munich Olympics Massacre and Israel's Deadly Response outlet sale

Striking Back: popular high quality The 1972 Munich Olympics Massacre and Israel's Deadly Response outlet sale

Striking Back: popular high quality The 1972 Munich Olympics Massacre and Israel's Deadly Response outlet sale

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The first full account, based on access to key players who have never before spoken, of the Munich Massacre and the Israeli response–a lethal, top secret, thirty-year-long antiterrorism campaign to track down the killers.
1972. The Munich Olympics. Palestinian members of the Black September group murder eleven Israeli athletes. Nine hundred million people watch the crisis unfold on television, witnessing a tragedy that inaugurates the modern age of terror and remains a scar on the collective conscience of the world.
Back in Israel, Prime Minister Golda Meir vows to track down those responsible and, in Menachem Begin’s words, “run these criminals and murderers off the face of the earth.” A secret Mossad unit, code named Caesarea, is mobilized, a list of targets drawn up. Thus begins the Israeli response–a mission that unfolds not over months but over decades. The Mossad has never spoken about this operation. No one has known the real story. Until now.
Award-winning journalist Aaron Klein’s incisive and riveting account tells for the first time the full story of Munich and the Israeli counterterrorism operation it spawned. With unprecedented access to Mossad agents and an unparalleled knowledge of Israeli intelligence, Klein peels back the layers of myth and misinformation that have permeated previous books, films, and magazine articles about the “shadow war” against Black September and other terrorist groups.
Spycraft, secret diplomacy, and fierce detective work abound in a story with more drama than any fictional thriller. Burning questions are at last answered, including who was killed and who was not, how it was done, which targets were hit and which were missed. Truths are revealed: the degree to which the Mossad targeted nonaffiliated Black September terrorists for assassination, the length and full scope of the operation (far greater than previously suspected), retributive acts against Israel, and much more.
Finally, Klein shows that the Israeli response to Munich was not simply about revenge, as is popularly believed. By illuminating the tactical and strategic purposes of the Israeli operation, Striking Back allows us to draw profoundly relevant lessons from one of the most important counterterrorism campaigns in history.

From Publishers Weekly

Told in remarkable detail, author Klein (Time''s Jerusalem correspondent) chronicles the tragic Israeli hostage massacre at the 1972 Munich Olympics and the secret assassination campaign that followed. The execution of 11 Israeli athletes and coaches by members of Black September is presented as the result of the colossal ineptitude of West German and Bavarian officials. From this horrific event, the author departs on a fascinating examination of the Israeli response-a shadow war in which "Mossad combatants...were charged with carrying out the assassination orders, which had been passed down from Golda Meir to each successive prime minister." The Mossad quickly identified assassination targets for their involvement in the Munich Massacre; as the program evolved, however, the Mossad''s goals expanded, creating a systematic counter-terror campaign based on prevention and deterrence. On the heels of Operation Spring of Youth, in which Israeli commandos assassinated three high-level PLO and Fatah officials in Beirut, "the myth of Israel''s military capacity and the long reach of the Mossad was hitting its peak," putting terrorists on the defensive. Klein''s account is well researched and highly valuable, and while the episodic structure he employs becomes repetitive, it is nevertheless a necessary read for anyone interested in Israeli history and politics as well as the birth of modern counter-terrorism.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

About the Author

Aaron J. Klein is Time magazine’s Military and Intelligence Affairs correspondent in the Jerusalem Bureau. He was the recipient of 2002 Henry Luce Award and has been a consultant for CNN. Klein was the military/security correspondent and analyst for Hadashot and Al-Hamishmar, two of Israel’s leading national newspapers. He is a contributor to Malam, the journal for former IDF Intelligence, Mossad and Inernal Security Agency officers. He teaches at Hebrew University and is a Captain in the IDF’s Intelligence.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

1

TWENTY YEARS LATER

PARIS, LE MERIDIeN MONTPARNASSE HOTEL

MONDAY, JUNE 8, 1992, 1545H

The white Jeep Renegade hurtled down A-22 on its way to Paris. The driver was alone in the vehicle. He stopped twice, to buy food from a vending machine and gas from a pump. Five hours later, his surveillance tail almost lost him in the swirling rush-hour traffic of a Paris afternoon. On Rue du Commandant Mouchotte the trackers watched the new Renegade with the German plates, B-585X, make a sudden right turn. The driver of the surveillance car floored the accelerator and caught a glimpse of the Jeep as it dropped into the shadows of an underground parking garage. A quick look at the building explained the unexpected move: the garage belonged to the Le Méridien Montparnasse Hotel, an old, quality establishment in the heart of the upscale Montparnasse district, with over nine hundred rooms and suites, and a reputation for discretion. The visitor took the elevator to reception on the first floor. He registered under a pseudonym, paid cash, and went straight up to Room 2541 with a small suitcase in his hand.

The hotel guest was Atef Bseiso, a round-faced, elegantly dressed forty-four-year-old Palestinian who had been living in Tunis for the last ten years. He was the Palestine Liberation Organization-the PLO-liaison officer, working with, among others, the French internal security service, the Direction de la Surveillance du Territoire (DST). He was considered a rising star in his organization. His good relations with European intelligence agencies were, in large part, a product of his personal charm and charisma.

Bseiso was drained from the drive-he had covered the six-hundred-mile journey in nine hours flat. Despite his fatigue and the alluring pull of the room''s king-size bed, he went to the phone. Bseiso did not want to pass his only night in Paris with a remote control in his hand. He took out an address book and dialed the number of a PLO bodyguard. In Tunis, Bseiso felt safe; in Europe, he feared the Israelis. He had a list of names and numbers of men, frequently unarmed, who would accompany senior PLO officials in Europe to give them a sense of security. He told the man he''d be going out to dinner. The bodyguard offered to pick Bseiso up at the hotel. "I''ve driven enough for today," Bseiso said. "Let''s say nine at the entrance to the hotel. A tout à l''heure." He showered and got dressed.

Shabtai Shavit, the head of Israel''s Institute for Intelligence and Special Operations, the Mossad, received a brief message in the operation''s war room, located in a safe house in the 11th Arrondissement: "He''s in the Méridien Montparnasse. We''re getting ready." Shavit leaned back in his chair. The operation was in high gear. Shavit, in his early fifties, had run the Mossad for the past three years, and was well acquainted with undercover operations. He had served for six years as commander of the Mossad''s Caesarea unit, which was charged with special operations and with running undercover Mossad combatants in enemy territory. He was in Paris on a borrowed identity: a different name was on the passport in the pocket of his blazer. None of his peers in the French secret service, or any other branch of the French intelligence services, knew he was in the country. His gut told him the mission would go well. He had complete confidence in the professionalism of Caesarea''s combatants.

Ilan C, Caesarea''s intelligence collection officer, placed the thirty-by-forty-centimeter pictures of the facade of the Méridien Montparnasse Hotel on a table in another room in the Mossad safe house. The new pictures had been shot from a variety of angles and included the streets surrounding the hotel. The surveillance team had taken them as soon as Bseiso checked in. The operational plans, drawn up in advance by Caesarea officers, took a number of hotels into consideration, primarily the Méridien Etoile, an elegant hotel situated a few steps from the Champs-Elysées-but not the Méridien Montparnasse. Bseiso''s unexpected choice forced them to revise their plans accordingly. The work was done quickly and efficiently. In less than an hour a new plan was brought before Shavit. Time was tight, and Shavit, never garrulous under even the most relaxed circumstances, kept it brief. He asked Caesarea''s commander and the head of the assassination squad a few questions about the operation. He honed a few key points, and then, satisfied, approved the mission.

The surveillance team had followed Bseiso for three days. They tracked him from the moment he arrived in Berlin; his meetings with German intelligence officers of the Bundesamt für Verfassungsschutz (BfV); the purchase of the Jeep; his sprint to Paris. A half-dozen combatants, two cars, and two motorcycles comprised the surveillance team. Throughout, none of the operation''s planners at Caesarea had any idea where Bseiso would stay. Would he choose the apartment of a friend, a flat set up by the DST, or a plush hotel room, courtesy of the kingly budget of Fatah, the largest faction of the PLO? Now they knew where they had to act. The operation needed to go into full swing immediately, as Bseiso, a notoriously reluctant traveler, might well spend only one night in Paris. Perhaps the following day, after meeting a colleague from the DST, he would return home, and the opportunity that had presented itself would be gone, possibly forever. Intelligence reports showed that Bseiso, whose job demanded frequent travel, tried to stay in Tunis as much as possible. When he did leave, he flew, a mode of travel not so susceptible to Israeli attack. Planes go directly from point A to point B. The traveler is never alone. People in cars meander, stop for gas, and spend the night at hotels. Bseiso, it turned out, was in fact planning to leave the following evening. He would drive to Marseilles, put the Jeep on a ferry to Tunis, and surprise his wife, Dima, and their three children with the new car.

The Israelis waited in ambush outside the hotel. They assumed Bseiso would go out for dinner. When he returned, tired and contented, they would act. The late hours of the night, when the streets are quiet and empty, were always best for covert operations. The final decision would be in the hands of the two assassins, "Tom" and "Frank." The point man, Tom, would pull the trigger. Up until the last instant, he would have the authority to call off the operation: he would raise his weapon only when certain that his team would emerge unscathed.

Atef Bseiso was a target because of the role he played in the slaughter of eleven Israeli Olympians in Munich, in 1972, almost twenty years prior. Shabtai Shavit wanted him to pay the price for participating in the killings. Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir authorized the mission and gave it his blessing. The state of Israel was on the verge of closing its case against another one of the "bastards," as they were known in the Mossad, who took part in the Munich Massacre.

Bseiso did go out to dinner. The Caesarea surveillance team shadowed him, undetected, the whole time. They checked that he wasn''t being guarded by his DST hosts. Bseiso, his bodyguard, and an unidentified Lebanese woman spent a pleasant night at a Hippopotamus Grill chain restaurant. It was after midnight when Bseiso picked up the tab and went back to the Jeep. He sat in the back, his bodyguard drove, and his friend sat in the front seat. They had a very loud, animated conversation in Arabic. A short drive brought them to the entrance of the Méridien Montparnasse. The Rue du Commandant Mouchotte was quiet; few cars passed by.

Bseiso got out and said goodbye to his friends. He took one step back, preparing to move in the direction of the hotel. A few seconds later, two young men approached him. Their walk was loose, casual. Tom, the point man, raised his hand and pulled the trigger. The Beretta 0.22 issued its shots in silence, the retorts muzzled by a silencer. The three bullets hit Bseiso in the head. He fell on the spot, next to his friend''s car, his final inhalation a gurgle. The hot cartridges were caught, along with the clues they held, in a sturdy cloth bag attached to the pistol. Within seconds, the assassin and his backup were rapidly retreating down the street.

"Abie," the commander of the squad, waited for them near the corner, 150 yards away. He watched them cross to the other side of Avenue du Maine and, from the other side of the street, at a more casual pace, watched their backs. This standard procedure was meant to thwart a mishap during the escape phase of a mission-a highly unlikely scenario, since it takes bystanders many long seconds, if not minutes, to realize that an assassination has just taken place. Nonetheless, the possibility couldn''t be ignored. Within twenty seconds the point man and his number two were at the corner of a one-way street. According to Mossad procedure, the getaway car always waits two 90-degree turns from the scene of an operation. The pair made a left onto Rue Vandamme, where the waiting car had kept its motor running.

Abie suddenly noticed two figures coming after his men. They were breathing heavily and speaking animatedly. This was a fast-approaching threat; they needed to be stopped. They could not be allowed to turn the corner and see the escape vehicle, or, even worse, commit the license plate to memory. Abie started toward them, his quick pace authoritative and threatening. When he was within fifteen feet of the pair he pulled out his Beretta. Holding it in front of their faces, he shouted: "Stop!" The weapon froze them in their tracks. They put their hands in the air, stumbled backwa...

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4.3 out of 54.3 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

lisa
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A compelling Read
Reviewed in the United States on November 18, 2017
As an Israeli citizen and a member of the IDF we know from what point of view Klien is presenting Munich and subsequent events. Yet, he still presents many of Israel’s adversaries as human and as dedicated to their cause as the Mossad. Klien provides sufficient detail... See more
As an Israeli citizen and a member of the IDF we know from what point of view Klien is presenting Munich and subsequent events. Yet, he still presents many of Israel’s adversaries as human and as dedicated to their cause as the Mossad. Klien provides sufficient detail while keeping the reader engrossed. He also, questions each individual assassination, but leaves plenty of room for the reader to come to his own conclusions. Clearly, many of the assassinations carried out by Mossad were on relatively easy targets. People who were chosen, not because of the gravity of their crimes, or potential danger, so much as they were not well hidden. It is clear that some of the targets Mossad took out may have potentially saved lives while others may have only served as revenge. It is difficult to prove with certainty.

One thing that was clear, and surprising, was the fantastic ineptitude of the Germans. Everything was botched, from security that may have prevented the attack in the first place to the ambush of the Black September terrorists at the airfield that the West Germans should have been able to carry out successfully, since it was they, not the terrorists, were able to choose the time and place of the action. The level of cowardice of the Germans was also hard to believe. When given an excuse – a hijacked plane – to free the three terrorists they did capture, the West German government did not hesitate. In fact most Western European governments are guilty of utterly shameful behavior. Of the 204 Arab terrorists captured in Europe during the 70’s and 80’s only 3 remained in jail. All others were released. So I have little sympathy for Europeans and the fact that their countries were a battle ground between Mossad their Arab adversaries.
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Kristy
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Best Book on the Subject
Reviewed in the United States on April 18, 2013
I have read many books on this subject, including Vengeance, the book on which Spielberg based his sappy, overly moralized movie "Munich," and One Day In September, on which an award-winning documentary was based. Of the three I rate Klein''s book as the best.... See more
I have read many books on this subject, including Vengeance, the book on which Spielberg based his sappy, overly moralized movie "Munich," and One Day In September, on which an award-winning documentary was based. Of the three I rate Klein''s book as the best. There are three reasons for this: 1) Klein''s is the most recent, which allows him a broader historical perspective from which to judge Israel''s campaign, its results, and its repercussions, 2) Klein was granted access to Israeli government documents which had not been previously available, and 3) he is not an apologist for either side, finding fault with both the Palestinian terrorists and, several times, with Israel''s actions.

It is not an exhaustive study on the topic (Vengeance & September are each longer), but it covers both major and minor events in the campaign pretty thoroughly, if succinctly. Klein was granted more interviews with current and former officials from the Mossad, Israel''s secret intelligence service, than any author before him. That first hand knowledge, combined with a punchy writing style and his unprecedented access to relevant government documents, makes this a compelling and very educational read.
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panda belle
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A well written easy to understand account of the first hostage crisis that unfolded in real time and the response to the horror.
Reviewed in the United States on December 29, 2014
we all watched it ... we were all horrified by the Munich games massacre. we saw it all unfold and could see the flaws in the German/Bavarian governments'' mishandling of the event. i must insert here however, that, the event did produce, a later event in Germany by... See more
we all watched it ... we were all horrified by the Munich games massacre. we saw it all unfold and could see the flaws in the German/Bavarian governments'' mishandling of the event. i must insert here however, that, the event did produce, a later event in Germany by spurring that government to establish an excellent hostage crisis response unit and other countries established similar units based on the German model. while many governments may have thought about establishing specialty response units that particular type of police response was at the very least in its infancy. no one had SWAT teams as such established, hostage responses were not standardized in any jurisdiction.

this book does not dwell on the Munich event except to present the event succinctly but it does present both sides of the resulting conflict. if you read any book about this tragedy and how it radically changed police response to hostage situations, high profile or not, this is the one to read as you will learn the underlying tensions and reasons for the entire situation.

while watching this tragedy unfold, we all knew that the outcome was not going to be the happy ending that a book of fiction would serve up, we knew this was too serious and too intense to end well and clearly saw the flaws in the response to the crisis. we remarked at the time ... why are the television news crews showing this in real time? don''t they understand that while it was a huge news event, they were providing exactly the information needed by the perpetrators and it was easy to see that nothing the police were going to try was going to be kept secret from the men who committed this heinousness. so ... we now have trained hostage negotiators, and rapid highly trained police response teams specifically trained for these situations. how long we will have them given congressional constipation regarding all federal funding is one of the questions we can only hope is well thought out and well handled. this can and has happened elsewhere, even here in the USA, albeit not on such a grand stage, it is happening in other countries on a regular basis (ie, terroristic kidnappings in certain southern border towns). unfortunately, not all nations learned a lesson from this event and we can only hope that the US government insists on retaining these specialized police units as well as other rapid response teams specialized for other crimes.

all in all, the book is quite balanced and reads much like a novel which should make it an easy if unpleasant read for some, but it is an important book for anyone interested in not only the world horror of such an event, but also in various nations'' response within their own policing or military agencies.
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Kindle Customer Fred J. Dietrich, DVM
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Eye Opening
Reviewed in the United States on December 28, 2017
I found this account both revealing and disturbing. Revealing for the detail of the subject and disturbing for the same reason. I realize that the public should not expect to be informed of all things clandestine on a near real time basis but it is eye opening... See more
I found this account both revealing and disturbing. Revealing for the detail of the subject and
disturbing for the same reason. I realize that the public should not expect to be informed of
all things clandestine on a near real time basis but it is eye opening to read how covert these
operations have remained for all these years. Very good read. I would recommend this book
to anyone interested in the aftermath of the Munich Massacre and how far reaching that
terrible event was (is).
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Oldshep
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good Read- well writtem
Reviewed in the United States on June 23, 2014
I was always under the impression that Israel and the Mossad killed all the perpetrators of the Munich Olympics massacre- they didn''t; I was suprised to read about how perps were picked for assasination and the levels of verification, oversight and study that went into... See more
I was always under the impression that Israel and the Mossad killed all the perpetrators of the Munich Olympics massacre- they didn''t; I was suprised to read about how perps were picked for assasination and the levels of verification, oversight and study that went into eliminating every terririst on the list. I have more respect for Israel after reading this book as their assination efforts put a huge dent into terrorists and terrorism. This was an intresting and elightening read. For example, I never knew how bad the West German govertment and Bavarian officials blew the prisoner exchange and the fact that west Germany and Bavaria were so porrly prepared for terrorists and terrorism.
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D. Buxman
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Revenge as a Deterrent
Reviewed in the United States on August 21, 2014
As we continue to deal with modern acts of terrorism, this book examines the path the Israelis took in the wake of the murder of their Olympic athletes in 1972. By systematically hunting and assassinating those who were involved (and some who weren''t), Israel was able to... See more
As we continue to deal with modern acts of terrorism, this book examines the path the Israelis took in the wake of the murder of their Olympic athletes in 1972. By systematically hunting and assassinating those who were involved (and some who weren''t), Israel was able to force terrorists to spend more time looking over their shoulders and less time planning attacks. This book is well written, fast-paced and reads like a novel. I was shocked by the level of incompetence and near complicity exercised by the West German government. They should be ashamed to this day. I think our leaders could learn from Israel''s approach in addressing terrorists today.
4 people found this helpful
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NO FLIES ON ME
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Thorough, Revelatory, and Exciting Storytelling
Reviewed in the United States on November 20, 2020
I remember the terrorist attack in Munich. This book gives the reader a detailed account of the events that took place during those 24 hours—and in the ensuing years as the nation of Israel fought for its right to exist. Revelatory. Highly recommended.
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Stephen F. Davids
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This isn''t "Munich"
Reviewed in the United States on March 3, 2006
This excellent book is by an Israeli journalist who was able to get remarkable access to Mossad. One might think this would result in a one-sided presentation, but Klein has done an excellent job of being extremely objective and analyzing the twin motivations of revenge... See more
This excellent book is by an Israeli journalist who was able to get remarkable access to Mossad. One might think this would result in a one-sided presentation, but Klein has done an excellent job of being extremely objective and analyzing the twin motivations of revenge and deterrence that underlay the strike-back assassinations after Munich. The only point on which he isn''t objective (and with good reason) is in his unreserved condemnation of the action, inaction, negligence, and callousness (not to mention stupidity) of the German officials during the 21 hours or so of the hostage crisis. The book is worth reading for his thorough account of that one day in September.

Klein''s analysis of the Mossad reaction is unsparing, especially in the disaster and tragedy at Lilliehammer, when Mossad agents killed an innocent man whom they should have realized was not Ali Hassan Salameh ("The Red Prince"). Six Mossad operatives were actual imprisoned in Norway for this crime, and the fact that "Munich" never makes mention of this incident is sufficient refutation to those who ridiculously claim that Spielberg and Tony Kushner were insufficiently sympathetic to Israel. While he wrote the book in Hebrew, Klein makes it clear this is not an apologia for Mossad. He sternly questions the rightness of the process in which Palestinian terrorists were identified and "prosecuted" in "show trials" before Israeli Prime Ministers who issued death sentences. People identified as "architects" of Munich often had little if any direct connection to the tragedy. He also carefully analyses the deterrence claim. While Black September terror largely faded after the strike-back assassinations, this appears to have had much to do with the PLO''s attempt for legitimacy (Arafat addressing the U.S. in 1974, etc.) and reluctance to incur the wrath of potentially friendly European governments by continuing to execute terror strikes in their countries. Klein also explodes the myth of Mossad invincibility, pointing out with great irony that two of the actual Munich terrorists are still alive, and neither of the actual planners of the mission (Abu Daoud and Abu Ehyad) died at Mossad''s hands. Abu Daoud is, in fact, still alive, and Abu Ehyad was assassinated by an extremist Abu Nidal follower because Abu Ehyad had become "soft" on the destruction of Israel.

Don''t confuse this book with the movie "Munich," however. "Munich" is based on a different book, George Jonas''s "Vengeance," based on the recollections of a Mossad agent. There have been some criticisms and questions of "Avner"''s story in "Vengeance." Klein''s account, however, shows that the initial 3 assassinations and the Spring of Youth assassinations in Beiruit were generally very accurately portrayed in "Munich." I see "Munich" as more of a philosophical question about the human cost of the eye-for-an-eye approach, and the ultimate futility of translating ideology into direct and violent action, especially when it means undertaking violent action that is dangerously similar to the type of action undertaken by your enemy. Klein''s book is more of a thoughtful policy analysis of what Mossad did, and whether it was effective. While Klein claims that moral judgments are far beyond the scope of his book, they are an inevitable consequence of evaluating the remarkable research that he has compiled.
51 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

G Thomas
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A fairly good read.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 14, 2021
This is a fairly well written book. However, some facts have been missed out. For instance, what about the innocent lives lost when Salameh was assassinated? Might have been better as two separate books.
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Isaac
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not quite what I had hoped
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 15, 2010
If you''ve seen One Day in September, this book will only be at most about 50% interesting, as the remainder is the same as that. I had hoped that more of the book was about the response to Munich; unfortunately about half the book describes the Munich massacre etc., and...See more
If you''ve seen One Day in September, this book will only be at most about 50% interesting, as the remainder is the same as that. I had hoped that more of the book was about the response to Munich; unfortunately about half the book describes the Munich massacre etc., and only the remainder describes the response to it. If you''ve not seen that film, then this is a pretty well written narrative along with some "behind the scenes" details, presumably from ex-Mossad agents, although at the the very end of the book Klein admits that he changes "minor details" for "dramatic effect" - so you''re left wondering just how much is true and how much has been buttered up. One last thing - this Kindle version doesn''t appear to have chapter marks so be prepared to add in bookmarks manually if you want to skip between chapters.
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KevBhav
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Do You Know the Story?
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 24, 2012
If you don''t know the story of how Golda Meir and the Israeli Secret Service reacted after the Munich Massacre of some of their athletes & officials, then this book is a 5-star read. Even knowing most of what happened and having already seen Steven Spielberg''s excellent...See more
If you don''t know the story of how Golda Meir and the Israeli Secret Service reacted after the Munich Massacre of some of their athletes & officials, then this book is a 5-star read. Even knowing most of what happened and having already seen Steven Spielberg''s excellent film, Munich, I was engrossed in the book. There are some slight differences between this book and Spielberg''s film, and I''m certainly not qualified to advise which is the most accurate, but this is a fascinating read about a tragic story all round.
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Nigel Tomlinson
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Compelling read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 28, 2021
I was completely new to the subject, not even sure what happened at the Munich Olympics in 1972. The shocking events are made real by the author and the book has inspired me to read more on the history of the region.
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John Bernard Roulson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Pleased
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 23, 2017
Very happy with my purchase
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