Smitten Kitchen Every Day: Triumphant and high quality Unfussy lowest New Favorites: A Cookbook online sale

Smitten Kitchen Every Day: Triumphant and high quality Unfussy lowest New Favorites: A Cookbook online sale

Smitten Kitchen Every Day: Triumphant and high quality Unfussy lowest New Favorites: A Cookbook online sale
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Description

Product Description

Deb Perelman, award-winning blogger and New York Times best-selling author of The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook, understands that a happy discovery in the kitchen has the ability to completely change the course of your day. Whether we’re cooking for ourselves, for a date night in, for a Sunday supper with friends, or for family on a busy weeknight, we all want recipes that are unfussy to make with triumphant results.

Deb thinks that cooking should be an escape from drudgery. Smitten Kitchen Every Day: Triumphant and Unfussy New Favorites presents more than one hundred impossible-to-resist recipes—almost all of them brand-new, plus a few favorites from her website—that will make you want to stop what you’re doing right now and cook. These are real recipes for real people—people with busy lives who don’t want to sacrifice flavor or quality to eat meals they’re really excited about.

You’ll want to put these recipes in your Forever Files: Sticky Toffee Waffles (sticky toffee pudding you can eat for breakfast), Everything Drop Biscuits with Cream Cheese, and Magical Two-Ingredient Oat Brittle (a happy accident). There’s a (hopelessly, unapologetically inauthentic) Kale Caesar with Broken Eggs and Crushed Croutons, a Mango Apple Ceviche with Sunflower Seeds, and a Grandma-Style Chicken Noodle Soup that fixes everything. You can make Leek, Feta, and Greens Spiral Pie, crunchy Brussels and Three Cheese Pasta Bake that tastes better with brussels sprouts than without, Beefsteak Skirt Steak Salad, and Bacony Baked Pintos with the Works (as in, giant bowls of beans that you can dip into like nachos).

And, of course, no meal is complete without cake (and cookies and pies and puddings): Chocolate Peanut Butter Icebox Cake (the icebox cake to end all icebox cakes), Pretzel Linzers with Salted Caramel, Strawberry Cloud Cookies, Bake Sale Winning-est Gooey Oat Bars, as well as the ultimate Party Cake Builder—four one-bowl cakes for all occasions with mix-and-match frostings (bonus: less time spent doing dishes means everybody wins).

Written with Deb’s trademark humor and gorgeously illustrated with her own photographs, Smitten Kitchen Every Day is filled with what are sure to be your new favorite things to cook.

Review

A New York Times Best Seller

“This is the kind of book you could easily cook out of for a month straight without tiring of it. You could also simply sit down and read it cover-to-cover, thanks to Perelman’s honest, funny, and at times charmingly self-deprecating personal anecdotes that introduce each recipe. Where Perelman really shines is in coaxing big flavors out of minimal ingredients. . . . As with her first book, she shot all the photos herself in her own home kitchen, further adding to that sense of aspirational approachability. And really, that’s the Smitten Kitchen magic: recipes that are ingeniously creative but so accessible that they leave you thinking, ‘Why the hell didn’t I think of that?’” — Eater

“Equal parts tongue-in-cheek commentary and measuring instructions, Perelman''s style is relatable and fun. Her self-deprecating jokes are enough to make any novice cook feel comforted, and her well-thought-out recipe caveats will impress the most experienced baker. Perelman fills her latest cookbook with pages and pages of ‘real recipes for real people,’ as it says on the inside cover. I trust her to give me a great recipe for just about anything, and when a friend gives me a rave review, I tell them, ‘Deb hasn''t let me down yet.’” —Gabriela Saldivia, NPR

“No one delivers recipes inspired by equal parts curiosity and appetite quite like Smitten Kitchen’s Deb Perelman, and [here] she celebrates the ‘unfussy but triumphant’ recipes that make her . . . really excited to cook and eat. Try getting through the book without flagging the Jam-Bellied Scones, Bacony Baked Pintos with the Works, and Lemon Meringue Pie Smash, and we’ll be amazed.” — Epicurious

“[The] Smitten Kitchen blog has won fans and followers with its spot-on recipe curation and Perelman’s winning prose—she makes you feel like you’re her friend. This book is a collection of recipes that, she writes, ‘don’t just fit into our lives, they make us happy.’ Readers can reclaim joy in the kitchen, too, with cauliflower wedge salad, mini-matzo ball soup, tomato and gigante bean bake.” — The Boston Globe
 
“Deb Perelman, the beloved food blogger and author, finally returns with her second book, five years in the making. Taking the name of her popular blog, the book is so much more: Of the cookbook’s 115 recipes, 101 are brand new. Each recipe is accompanied by a photograph shot by Deb (as she’s simply known to her many followers), herself. . . . It’s no wonder this lovely new book took half a decade.” — Chicago Tribune

“A tremendously appealing collection of recipes whose headnotes strike chord after rousing chord. Yes, of course I want those Pizza Beans and Pretzel Linzer Cookies. And why have I never heard of Jam-Bellied Bran Scones before—or had the sense to put jam in the belly of any baked good at all?” —Kristen Miglore,   Food52

“Filled with fun and easy—but delicious and totally Instagramable—recipes that will have you actually looking forward to hitting the kitchen at the end of a long work day.” — Bustle

About the Author

DEB PERELMAN is a self-taught home cook, photographer, and the creator of smittenkitchen.com. She is the author of the New York Times best-selling The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook, which won the IACP Julia Child Award. Deb lives in New York City with her husband, son, and daughter.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

against drudgery

(or, hooray for breakfast, dinner, and cake)

One of the delights of life is eating with friends; second to that is talking about eating. And, for an unsurpassed double whammy, there is talking about eating while you are eating with friends. People who like to cook like to talk about food. Plain old cooks (as opposed to geniuses in fancy restaurants) tend to be friendly. After all, without one cook giving another cook a tip or two, human life might have died out a long time ago. —laurie colwin, Home Cooking

We home cooks have never gathered in force to speak out in defense of home cooking. So the image of cookery as drudgery lives on. —marion cunningham, Lost Recipes

This isn’t the cookbook I had expected to write.

When The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook headed to the printer in 2012, we were a family of three. Our two-year-old was eating table food, but in a dabbling way. Mostly, I cooked the food that I was excited to eat and little about having a kid changed how I went about it. In the years since, we’ve added another delicious little human to our family and while most people will tell you that going from 0 kids to 1 is the big adjustment, in the kitchen, the shift from 1 to 2 was more dramatic. All of a sudden, it wasn’t just us plus an extra half-portion stripped of offending chile peppers or with some couscous on the side to bait a suspicious toddler to the table. Quickly, half our family (ahem, the noisier half) needed square meals at predictable times and I, well . . . ​I began to understand why not everyone jumps with joy when it’s time to make dinner.

On any given night, most of us have countless really excellent reasons not to cook—be it picky kids, spouses, or roommates, or the extinction of a 9-to-5 workday that might actually get you home in time to assemble dinner for yourself, your friends, or your family. Even the people who are ostensibly cheering for you to cook can do more harm than good, be they restaurant chefs who forget you may not have a line of prep cooks at your disposal, recipe writers who alienate the budget-conscious by insisting on the “best” olive oil, or home-cooking advocates who tell you the very best thing you can do for your health/your children’s IQ/the economy/environment/nothing short of this earth (oh, the pressure!) is cook dinner every night—people who have clearly not spent a lot of time in the chaos of most households at Hangry O’Clock. (Roughly, 30 minutes after pizza would have been there already, at least around here.)

I began to wonder if it was time to write about the realities and practicalities of cooking. You know:

•How to Keep the Joy in Cooking

•42-ish Minute Meals (But You’ll Have to Rush)

•Things to Make with Broccoli and/or Sweet Potatoes, the Only Vegetables Everyone Agrees on This Week

•Just Kidding, the Baby Ate Blueberries for Dinner Again

There was only one problem: I didn’t want to write this book at all. And so I did not. I continued sharing new recipes a couple times a week on my website, Smitten Kitchen. I launched a newsletter. I worked with people to usher the technology behind my site into its second decade of web life. I started working with the Food Network on a digital series. I spent a lot of time around the table with friends and family and couldn’t help but notice that what was regularly taking place—telling stories, workshopping silly armchair philosophies, cracking up over the baby’s antics—barely resembled the compromised, plodding hypotheses I’d set out about cooking when life gets busier.

What I have always loved about cooking is the way a happy discovery—a new way to meatball, a four-ingredient farro that has caused more than 800 comment section exclamation points, cookies that look like clouds and taste like pink lemonade, crunchy spaghetti with crispy eggs, a birthday cake you can make from scratch in just over an hour (yes really) or maybe even four of them—has the power to completely change the course of a day.

I like the way that when you make something new and awesome the first thing you want to do is tell another friend about it so they can make it, too. I like the way following a recipe to the letter can feel like handing the reins over after a long day of having to make all the decisions, but also that pulling off a good meal when you least expected is the fastest way to feel triumphant, even if your day left you short of opportunities to. I like the way that when you sublimate your wanderlust in a dish—a cacio e pepe addiction picked up in Rome or a Thai salad with crispy shallots, lime, and fish sauce—it becomes a gateway, or an escape hatch, to so much more than dinner. I like the way that when you cook at home, you don’t actually have to compromise a thing; you get to make exactly what you want, exactly the way you want it, and then you get to invite all your favorite people over to pass the dish around. I like the way a great meal makes grouchy people ungrouchy or a thankless day filled with thankless stuff into a hilarious one. And I like the way the prospect of a fudgy one-bowl chocolate cake with a raft of chocolate frosting one hour from now might make us cancel our other plans.

And the thing is, people—that is, you, the people who have come along for all or part of Smitten Kitchen’s decade-plus story—had been trying to tell me this the whole time.

The stories in the comments and in my inbox are as much about the cooking as they are about the life around it—the delight from the surprise of a good meal, the person who thought they hated broccoli or Brussels sprouts finding that with the right preparation, they adore both, or finding, on a morning you think there’s no reason to cook, a new pancake recipe that you’re too curious not to make. This doesn’t mean that these dishes aren’t practical, that they cannot fit into a busy life, that they cannot accommodate picky eaters and grocery stores with limited imagination, it simply means that they don’t do that before—they don’t prioritize that over—making food that we are really, really excited to eat.

This book is how—forgive me—I got my groove back.

These recipes don’t just fit into our lives, they make us happy.

Happiness is great big bowls of beans that we dip into like nachos.

It’s my kids’ beloved roasted sweet potatoes given the dry-rub barbecue treatment, slaw and all.

It’s the famous chopped liver you get in a windowless basement restaurant on Christie Street that’s like a Bar Mitzvah that never ends (in a good way).

It’s a crunchy three-cheese pasta bake that tastes better with Brussels sprouts (yes, Brussels sprouts) than without.

It’s giant white beans cooked to the tune of baked ziti, bronzed melty lid and all.

It’s the hopelessly unapologetically inauthentic kale Caesar we make almost every week of the year.

It’s the English-muffin meets-Jewish-deli-rye-bread recipe I promised to a library full of people a book tour ago.

It’s a modern matzo ball soup and the beef bulgogi tacos I fell in love with at the Jersey shore.

It’s a whole-grain bread for people who don’t like to knead or time things, a bread that works on your schedule and not vice versa.

And such a great big noisy fuss over cake (and cookies and pies and Popsicles).

The jam-filled, sprinkle-rolled butter cookies I made at the bakery where I worked in high school.

The gooey oat and chocolate cookie bars that will win bake sales.

The strawberry tart that the stray friend we picked up at a party sixteen years tago coached me through over Skype from Germany.

The chocolate icebox cake to end all icebox cakes, with peanut butter too.

The crumb cake with impeccable priorities—that is, more crumbs than cake—and a very familiar name.

A sticky toffee pudding, but breakfast-style.

The blueberry muffins I made fifty ways before finding my forever formula.

And an accidental two-ingredient granola.

So while this isn’t the cookbook I expected to write, I like the one that’s emerged much more—a celebration of breakfast, dinner, cake, and everything in between, and maybe a bit of resistance, too: against the idea that cooking must be an obstacle to overcome or and that the food we most want to eat cannot also be practical. This book is all of my new favorite things to cook, and I hope you’ll find a few worthy of your Repeat Forever files, too.

deli rye english muffins
yield: 12 miniature (21/4-inch) or 8 standard-sized (31/2-to-33/4-inch) muffins

My favorite thing about this recipe is where it started, which, specifically, was in front of a library full of people in St. Louis while I was on a book tour. Someone asked me how I came up with recipes, and I’m sorry if it disappoints you to learn this, but I’ve never been good on my feet and was as fumbling and inarticulate as ever: “Uh, sometimes they just come to me? Or I’ll just get an idea when I’m on the crosstown bus and . . .” It was pretty bad, but since there was no one to rescue me, I just blathered along. “. . . ​Like, this morning, I was thinking how cool it would be if you could make an English muffin that tasted like rye bread, because they’re my two favorite kinds of toast to go with eggs,” and someone said, “You should! Now you can start your second book!”

So, as fated—eh, 2.5 years and one kid later—I began here. I learned a few things along the way. English-muffin recipes are divided into two camps: those that require pastry rings to hold the batter in shape, and those that use a thicker dough but allow you to free-form them. The first category make for great nooks and crannies, but are unquestionably a pest to maneuver. The second category have some nooks and a few crannies but don’t require any specialty-store purchases. To get the results of the peskier method without the hassle, I found you had to use a softer dough.

And then, once you’ve made English muffins that taste like a good deli rye bread, what do you do with them? Toasting them with sweet butter is always my first choice. They’re also excellent with a heap of scrambled eggs or a crispy fried one, maybe with a little hash underneath. And they’re good for any kind of sandwich you’d normally put on rye.

21/4 teaspoons (from a 7-gram or 1/4-ounce packet) active dry yeast

1/4 cup (60 ml) lukewarm water

3/4 cup (175 ml) milk or buttermilk

2 tablespoons (30 grams) unsalted butter, plus more for bowl

1 tablespoon (15 grams) granulated sugar

2/3 cup (80 grams) dark rye flour

11/3 cups (175 grams) all-purpose or bread flour, plus more for surface

11/2 teaspoons coarse or kosher salt

2 teaspoons (5 grams) whole or ground caraway seeds

Oil, for greasing bowl and coating skillet

Cornmeal, polenta, or semolina, for sprinkling

Combine the yeast and water in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook. Let rest 5 minutes; the yeast should dissolve and look slightly foamy. Gently warm the buttermilk, butter, and sugar to lukewarm (not hot), and add it to the yeast mixture, followed by the flours, salt, and caraway. Use the dough hook to combine until a shaggy, uneven dough forms; then let the hook knead it down on the lowest speed for 5 minutes, until the dough is stretchy and cohesive. Butter or oil a large bowl (or do as I do and remove the dough long enough to oil the mixing bowl, then return the dough to it), and let it proof at room temperature, covered with a dishcloth or plastic, for 1 hour. (That’s it!)

Lightly spray a large baking sheet with oil, then generously sprinkle it with cornmeal. Lightly flour your counter, turn the dough out onto it, flour the top, and gently deflate it with your hands. Divide the dough into pieces; twelve pieces for minis, eight for standard muffins. Roll them gently into balls, and place on the cornmealed baking sheet, pressing gently to flatten them into discs (about 3/4‑inch diameter). Spray the tops lightly with oil, and sprinkle them with cornmeal, too. Cover loosely, and proof at room temperature for 30 minutes more or up to 3 days in the fridge. If chilled, let them warm up for 30 minutes at room temperature before cooking.

Heat oven to 250 degrees.

Let a cast-iron skillet warm over the lowest heat for 5 to 7 minutes, then lightly coat the inside with neutral cooking oil for insurance against sticking, but not enough that the muffins will fry. Dust off the excess cornmeal from the muffins. Let the bottom of each muffin brown slowly and very gently in pan, about 5 minutes. (If yours are taking longer, you can bump the heat to medium-low.) Flip them, and cook for another 4 to 5 minutes. You can flip back and forth again if needed.

Shake the excess cornmeal off the baking sheet, and transfer pan-toasted muffins to oven. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes until sides are firm to the touch. Cool to almost room temperature, then fork-split.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
843 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

June90
2.0 out of 5 stars
Incredibly disappointed
Reviewed in the United States on October 31, 2017
Let me just start off by saying how much I love the smitten kitchen blog. I''ve been following it since around 2008, and I''ve made (and loved) countless recipes from the site over the years. I''ve been eagerly anticipating the release of this book ever since it was announced... See more
Let me just start off by saying how much I love the smitten kitchen blog. I''ve been following it since around 2008, and I''ve made (and loved) countless recipes from the site over the years. I''ve been eagerly anticipating the release of this book ever since it was announced back in 2015. I''m so disappointed to not be leaving a glowing review, because I absolutely adore Deb.
Like a few of the other reviewers, I just didn''t find many recipes here that I want to make. One of the greatest things about Deb as a food blogger is her obsession with making the "perfect" version of a given dish. In her quest to get it just right she will test and re-test until she gets there, often taking the best parts of several recipes and combining them into her own perfect one. Her blog is often my first stop when searching for a specific recipe, because I know that her version is always great. Things like her "ethereally smooth hummus", "favorite brownies", peach pie, pecan pie, double chocolate banana bread, "perfect blueberry muffins", "better chocolate babka" (and so many others) have become go-to recipes that I''ll never deviate from. Other dishes, like the chicken pho, carnitas, consumate chocolate chip cookies, pork ragu, root vegetable gratin etc. are not her own, but carefully chosen, perfect recipes from other authors that I would not have discovered otherwise.

Unfortunately, there is far more pressure to be original when publishing a book instead of a blog post. I think the book suffers from this need to make something "brand new", when her strength lies elsewhere.
I also think the title of the book is unfortunate; many of the recipes are indeed very fussy. Looking at the breakfast chapter for instance, barely any of them can be done in less than one hour. The "loaded breakfast potato skins" are truly perplexing to me. Who on earth is spending 60 minutes baking a potato for breakfast? The "jam-bellied bran scones" also seem needlessly fussy to me. The point of making scones for breakfast is that they come together in five minutes. Why spend all this time carefully making jam-filled ones when breaking open a perfect, warm-from-the-oven scone and slathering it with butter and jam probably tastes better (with much less work). The same goes for the "granola biscotti". It looks very similar to the granola recipe from the first book (that I''ve made many times), just more fussy and gimmicky.

Like I mentioned, I generally found very few recipes that I''m tempted to make. Obviously, this is very subjective, and other people might find plenty of things they want to cook. Personally, I was particularly let down by the "Salads" and "Vegetable mains" chapters. The salads were not appealing to me at all, while many of the vegetable mains are more like side-dishes (pommes anna, zucchini with salsa verde, roasted halloumi and vegetables etc). The blog recipes are often vegetarian, so I was surprised that these chapters were not better. (Also, please no more fritters!).
It is not all bad though. I will definitely be trying the "chicken and rice, street cart style", the "ricotta blini with honey, orange and sea salt", "Manhattan style clams with fregola", and the "meatballs marsala with egg noodles and chives". But that''s probably also all..
579 people found this helpful
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S&J
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fussier than advertised
Reviewed in the United States on September 25, 2018
First of all - I love Deb. Her blog is my favorite and the first resource I check when trying a recipe. This cookbook is wildly “fussy”. It is not an everyday cookbook. It’s frustrating when I read an introduction saying that dinner will be done in less than 30... See more
First of all - I love Deb. Her blog is my favorite and the first resource I check when trying a recipe.

This cookbook is wildly “fussy”. It is not an everyday cookbook. It’s frustrating when I read an introduction saying that dinner will be done in less than 30 minutes - then read the recipe, and see that it will take well over 90. I love the meatballs Marsala, but they take forever. Same with so many of these recipes. The original SK cookbook was better
38 people found this helpful
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kuenzi123
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
that I have tried from Smitten Kitchen - the website or her books - has been awesome, and I either have made
Reviewed in the United States on April 25, 2018
I follow a ton of food blogs. Deb at Smitten Kitchen is the only one that I basically 100% trust. She takes pride in her recipes and tries them again and again. I am not exaggerating when I say that every. single. recipe. that I have tried from Smitten Kitchen - the website... See more
I follow a ton of food blogs. Deb at Smitten Kitchen is the only one that I basically 100% trust. She takes pride in her recipes and tries them again and again. I am not exaggerating when I say that every. single. recipe. that I have tried from Smitten Kitchen - the website or her books - has been awesome, and I either have made, or will make, more than once. Unlike a lot of food bloggers, she is a true writer, super entertaining and not "OMG THIS IS THE BEST RECIPE EVER!!! YOU WILL LOVE IT!" Deb is personable, honest, and totally devoted to her craft. I will buy every cookbook she writes until I die. I know this sounds exaggerated, but I have tried SO many new techniques through following this cookbook and the blog (like the most incredible galette crust I''ve ever eaten despite being a total newbie to dough) and I will always be grateful!
19 people found this helpful
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Jorj
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
reigniting my love of cooking!
Reviewed in the United States on February 11, 2018
I have a 5 year old and a 1 year old, so I don''t have as much time to cook as I would like. Also unfortunately my five year old isn''t really into that much of what I would cook for my own pleasure. This has gotten me into a rut with cooking where I''m not that excited about... See more
I have a 5 year old and a 1 year old, so I don''t have as much time to cook as I would like. Also unfortunately my five year old isn''t really into that much of what I would cook for my own pleasure. This has gotten me into a rut with cooking where I''m not that excited about what I''m making and it is a bit of a let down. I first got this cookbook out of the library and immediately I cooked about 5 recipes from it in the first week. Love the pizza beans, and the cover recipe -- the cacio e pepe potatoes anna -- is delicious and elegant and made me proud to have made it. I even made the butternut squash flatbread this past weekend. This is a cookbook that reminds you of things you have done in the past but then pushes you to try it in a new way. This is good because cooking with a ton of new ingredients or new techniques is just not on the docket these days. These recipes inspire me to take the every day recipe one step further so it feels more triumphant -- to quote the subtitle. Have loved Smitten Kitchen for years and honestly love this cookbook way more than the first one (although that has some great stand-out recipes like the granola and the mushroom bourguignon)
21 people found this helpful
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Kelly M. Jones
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Somewhat fussy ingredients.
Reviewed in the United States on March 30, 2018
This cookbook has a lot of varied and delicious looking recipes, I''ve tried a couple and they have turned out nicely. My biggest issue is this is what I consider a "New York" cookbook, it has great recipes, but I have only found one or two that don''t call for some... See more
This cookbook has a lot of varied and delicious looking recipes, I''ve tried a couple and they have turned out nicely. My biggest issue is this is what I consider a "New York" cookbook, it has great recipes, but I have only found one or two that don''t call for some less-than-common ingredient. Sometimes it''s as simple as grabbing a particular dairy product I don''t keep in stock (yogurt, cream cheese, ricotta, etc.), but often it is a somewhat difficult to source ingredient like parmesan rinds, rye flour, or specific seafood.
I don''t want to detract from the overall enjoyment of this book, but it''s a sticking point for me with a lot of cookbooks, they are simply less fun if I have to order items online or scour the city for several ingredients.
I would say her recipes are "unfussy" in that they are simple to put together, but they are fairly fussy in the amount of ingredients and the type of ingredients required. I''m not sure I would have picked this up if I had had a chance to browse it in person first, but I''ll keep it on hand for times when I feel like doing a nice project meal.
19 people found this helpful
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HipChickDigs
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great for dietary restrictions, people with kids, or busy folks just craving delicious + simply weeknight meals
Reviewed in the United States on March 8, 2018
This was our recent choice for my monthly cookbook club and I loved all the recipes our group made so much that I ran out and bought the book the next day. Love the easy, everyday recipes that we can make on a busy weeknight. One of my kids has a medically... See more
This was our recent choice for my monthly cookbook club and I loved all the recipes our group made so much that I ran out and bought the book the next day. Love the easy, everyday recipes that we can make on a busy weeknight.

One of my kids has a medically restricted diet (PKU) that emphasizes fruits + veggies, and this book has been easy to adapt for him. Almost everyone I know has a dietary restriction in their house and really love that this book has an index at the back to help you find recipes inside that are dairy free, gluten free, etc.

This is an excellent book for homecooks with kids - although there is plenty of fun recipes for people without kids too. But my kids have not turned their noses up at a single recipe yet, which is a homerun in our house.
5 people found this helpful
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MLINUS
5.0 out of 5 stars
It''s The Smitten Kitchen, all grown up. Interesting, varied, and easy-to-succeed-with recipes.
Reviewed in the United States on November 9, 2017
I''ve gathered from reading a few of the negative reviews that some people are disappointed that Deb''s latest creation isn''t what they expected -- which I guess was more of what "The Smitten Kitchen" contained, i.e. basic dishes, done better. I loved TSK -- it was... See more
I''ve gathered from reading a few of the negative reviews that some people are disappointed that Deb''s latest creation isn''t what they expected -- which I guess was more of what "The Smitten Kitchen" contained, i.e. basic dishes, done better. I loved TSK -- it was Deb who finally taught me how to make the perfect mac & cheese sauce, full of parmesan cheese and not a glop or string in sight. Her tiny meatloaves are another little slice of perfection. But I love the new book for its variety. There is something interesting in every dish, and everything I''ve made from it so far has turned out just right, and been wildly, enthusiastically received by my ''tired of the same old thing'' family. I think people might be interpreting ''unfussy'' to mean variations on things you already make? IDK but I''m thrilled to have some new recipes. Like TSK, the recipes are very well-tested. I''m no chef, so I need the extra resilience. But Every Day gives me ways to branch out, without waiting for a dinner party. You can''t get ''triumphant'' out of the same old recipes. Also, I have to say this about another review that complained about the ''loaded potato skin'' breakfast recipe. My teenage swimmer hugged me after I made these for him. It''s the same ingredients of many a breakfast (eggs, potatoes, cheese, bacon, etc) but reimagined in a way that made a kid who''s usually comatose in the morning actually talk with us! I hope Deb keeps writing...
120 people found this helpful
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Allibob1
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Triumphant Indeed
Reviewed in the United States on December 22, 2017
I know many people consider cookbooks worthy of keeping in their kitchen if they make 1-2 recipes from them. I have made about eight recipes from this cookbook and have yet to experience a single disappointment. Each one has me excited for dinner, and delighted by my... See more
I know many people consider cookbooks worthy of keeping in their kitchen if they make 1-2 recipes from them. I have made about eight recipes from this cookbook and have yet to experience a single disappointment. Each one has me excited for dinner, and delighted by my results. I can customize them a bit here and there, making it flex to fit my family. The only quibble is perhaps they are too delicious, four serving meals are usually made into two serving meals followed by two very full and satisfied adults.

I have made:
- Magical Two Ingredient Oat Brittle (indeed magical, delicious on yogurt or by itself)
- Kale Caesar with Broken Egg (Delicious, love the cheater Caesar Dressing)
- Roasted Tomato Soup with Broiled Cheddar
- A very simple pizza dough (Left to rise overnight, perfection)
- Crispy Tofu and Broccoli with Sesame Peanut Pesto (I''ve started doubling this so we can have leftovers, and making it with chicken instead of tofu. This is my favorite recipe in the book so far)
- Meatballs Marsala with Egg Noodles and Chives (Divine)

I can''t wait to cook the rest of this wonderful cookbook.
One person found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Rincewind
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Bought it for a Smitten Kitchen fan
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 18, 2018
Bought it for my girlfriend which is a Smitten Kitchen fan and loves cooking. She loved it and enjoyed this book more than the previous one as it has recipes she can use more often. The pictures are amazing and the book edition is of great quality. I have only read a few...See more
Bought it for my girlfriend which is a Smitten Kitchen fan and loves cooking. She loved it and enjoyed this book more than the previous one as it has recipes she can use more often. The pictures are amazing and the book edition is of great quality. I have only read a few pages here and there but I like Deb style of writing with a short introduction before the recipe and sharing some of her life experiences which makes you somehow feel close to the author. I like the style of food and I will definitely borrow it sometime and try it.
11 people found this helpful
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Sarah C
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Exceeded expectations and some really tasty meals
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 16, 2018
I heard so many good things about this book so decided to order my own copy. Wow - I was blown away! Deb is really good at taking comfort food to a new level - her recipes aren''t over the top sweet or super unhealthy, but wholesome and easy to whip up. Highly recommend this...See more
I heard so many good things about this book so decided to order my own copy. Wow - I was blown away! Deb is really good at taking comfort food to a new level - her recipes aren''t over the top sweet or super unhealthy, but wholesome and easy to whip up. Highly recommend this book - the recipes are amazing!
2 people found this helpful
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Mark Jones
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Difficult 2nd album....
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 8, 2018
Nothing wrong with this book, the recipes are still easy to follow etc but didn’t get me excited like the first book. Some nice things in here but left me a little underwhelmed
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Susan Grant
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Holiday Yummies
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 28, 2018
Using the recipes on my holiday and cannot wait
One person found this helpful
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LouLou
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Yum
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 14, 2018
Lovely recipes. Deb Perelman is a genius, her recipes seem to be truly tried and tested as without fail they are easy to follow and delicious to eat!
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