A 2021 People's History of the outlet sale Supreme Court outlet online sale

A 2021 People's History of the outlet sale Supreme Court outlet online sale

A 2021 People's History of the outlet sale Supreme Court outlet online sale

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Traces the history of the Supreme Court from 1787 to the present day, profiling every justice from John Jay to Stephen Breyer, and examines the cases that have transformed American history and the court''s controversial rulings on such issues as racial segregation, abortion, gay rights, and free speech. 17,500 first printing.

Amazon.com Review

The savvy, chatty author of The Courage of Their Convictions brings us a scholarly reckoning of the 200-plus years of decisions made by the highest court in the land. Not surprisingly (and justifiably, given his erudite arguments), represents the court''s work as a never-ending appeal of the powerless to the powerful: of the just over 100 supreme justices who have sat on the court, all but two have been white, all but two have been men, and all but seven have been Christian, whereas the supplicants to our nation''s highest bar are typically racial minorities, women, and deviants in some way from the religious and social mainstream.

Taking a representative (if not comprehensive) accounting of the Supreme Court''s most significant decisions, Irons puts cultural and political context--and a human face--to the parties involved, painting an absorbing and involving picture of landmark cases that readers are likely to recall but not fully understand. Whether he''s explicating the tortuous history of freedom-seeking slave Dred Scott or explaining the "a Jap''s a Jap" reasoning behind the legal exculpation of World War II internment camps, Irons reminds us of the court''s spotted history while still conveying the deep affection he has for it. (Includes a thoughtful appendix with the complete text of the Constitution and suggestions for further reading.) --Paul Hughes

From Publishers Weekly

Presenting a sophisticated narrative history of the Supreme Court, Irons (The Courage of Their Convictions, etc.) illustrates the beguiling legacy left by the Constitution''s framers, who conjured up the high Court without providing an instruction manual. Irons is clear about where his ideological sympathy lies, calling Justice William Brennan "my judicial ideal and inspiration" and quoting Brennan''s famous formulation that "the genius of the Constitution" rests in "the adaptability of its great principles to cope with current problems and current needs." Irons traces the development of the Court''s peculiar institutional workings from its first proceedings under Chief Justice John Jay to the struggle for individual liberties during the successive Warren, Burger and Rehnquist Courts. In characterizing the Court as a bastion of racism, classism and sexism prior to Earl Warren''s ascendancy, he often tends to use extended arguments when quick jabs would suffice. But as he delves into the personalities of litigants, justices and senators (who, as far back as 1831, fought fiercely over the confirmations of Supreme Court nominees), Irons proves himself a master of American legal and political history. He is particularly lucid when recounting how Reconstruction reforms, such as the Fourteenth Amendment, that were intended to ensure the liberties of individuals were co-opted by the Gilded Age Court to protect the liberties of business. Irons combines careful research with a populist passion. In doing so, he breathes abundant life into old documents and reminds readers that today''s fiercest arguments about rights are the continuation of the endless American conversation. BOMC selection. (Aug.)
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Irons, professor of political science and director of the Earl Warren Bill of Rights Project at the University of California, San Diego, as well as the author of eight other books on the U.S. Supreme Court, provides an excellent general history of the Court accessible to lay readers. The main theme is the attempts of ordinary citizens to attain their rights (especially of free speech, religious practices, and personal privacy) through appeal to the Court and to change the shape and meaning of our Constitutional system. Irons briefly discusses judicial opinions in major cases throughout history and shows when the Justices chose to apply constitutional principles, often to the detriment of civil rights and to the rights of disadvantaged groups, such as blacks and women. The book ends with the Casey (1992) decision and the presidential election of 1992. This book will give the general populace better understanding of the Constitution and its history.ASteven Puro, St. Louis Univ.
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

Irons, a civil liberties lawyer and history professor, brings to life the common people whose real-life circumstances proved precedent setting in Supreme Court decisions. He focuses on the human aspect of decisions, from the impact of the slave trade and related issues in the formation of the nation to the contradictory values of the founding fathers and subsequent lawmakers. Irons reveals that the Bill of Rights was not central to the views of one founder, James Madison; the focus on individual rights was actually a compromise designed to secure ratification of the Constitution. Irons examines how the law has intersected with politics, from the passage of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth amendments during the radical reconstruction period through the Jim Crow era, when blacks were stripped of previously adjudicated rights. Irons clearly and repeatedly shows how the law reflects political reality above esoteric legal mandates. Irons continues his analysis to 1992, with case histories exploring the political context of the times. His work gives contextual richness to the history of an important American institution. Vernon Ford

From Kirkus Reviews

This sweeping history of the Supreme Court will thoroughly aggravate anyone who believes, along with Robert Bork or Justice Antonin Scalia that the Constitution should be read narrowly. Irons (Political Science/Univ. of California, San Diego; May It Please the Court: The First Amendment, 1997, etc.) makes no bones about his ideological stance. To him, the Constitution must be construed in the context of an evolving nation. Not surprisingly, former Justice William Brennan remains my judicial ideal and inspiration. Irons is at his best when he focuses on those litigants before the Court who were outsiders seeking empowerment: people like Fred Korematsu, who challenged the evacuation of Japanese-Americans during WWII, or Homer Plessy, who in 1892 had the audacity to ride in a Louisiana railroad car reserved for white passengers. The decision to explain the Supreme Court and its evolving doctrines through the stories of those whose cases generated rulings that subsequently affected every citizen makes the book accessible to nonlawyers who have a general interest in legal history. This may be why the chapters that trace the early years of the court make for slow going: the little guy litigants with whom Irons identifies are missing, and instead we are left slogging through rehashed material. Finally, while Irons is unabashed about his viewpoint, this candor does nothing to assure readers new to the subject that they are getting the whole, if partisan, story. Irons has a disquieting habit of using loaded adjectives and verbs when describing the thoughts of those justices with whom he disagrees. Thus, Felix Frankfurter pontificates and gives a civics lecture in an opinion that Irons views as wrongheaded, and he barely conceals his disdain for justices, like William Rehnquist and Clarence Thomas, on the other side of the ideological debate. Irons is preaching to the choir. While his history contains a few great stories, it will change no minds. (Book-of-the-Month Club selection) -- Copyright ©1999, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved.

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4.4 out of 54.4 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Joseph H.
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great information, terrible execution by the publisher on the Kindle version
Reviewed in the United States on February 28, 2019
3 stars for content and delivery. Minus 2 stars for the crazy amount of typo''s. I normally wait until I am completely done books before posting a review, but after completing about 30% of this book I just had to post a review. The content is really quite good,... See more
3 stars for content and delivery. Minus 2 stars for the crazy amount of typo''s.

I normally wait until I am completely done books before posting a review, but after completing about 30% of this book I just had to post a review. The content is really quite good, and Peter Irons is well researched and presents the facts in a way that is easy to read and understand. HOWEVER, the Kindle version is FULL of typo''s of all kinds. Everything from words being misspelled ("Sipreme Court" is one of the more annoying ones) to random punctuation marks being added in the middle of sentences, to missing capitalization or having words be randomly capitalized in the middle of sentences. The publisher clearly has treated the Kindle version as a second class citizen. I stopped submitting errors after about 15% of the book because I was sending one almost every time I swiped to a new page. It''s clear it was not proofread after they converted it to the Kindle format. It really takes away from what would otherwise be a really great book.

If you''re going to buy this I''d get the physical editions, from what I can see in reviews it is not loaded with the same typographical errors.
20 people found this helpful
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D. Eppenstein
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Truth is that it turned out to be something better. Based on its title and description I was ...
Reviewed in the United States on July 7, 2015
To begin with this book was not what I expected or hoped to find. Truth is that it turned out to be something better. Based on its title and description I was hoping to get a book that would tell the story of the real people whose names make up the captions in the... See more
To begin with this book was not what I expected or hoped to find. Truth is that it turned out to be something better. Based on its title and description I was hoping to get a book that would tell the story of the real people whose names make up the captions in the landmark cases of the SCOTUS. The book did indeed give me some of the back story for many of these cases and it gave me a whole lot more that I wasn''t expecting. I do not know how he did it but the author was able to fill in a lot of background on the justices, who appointed them, why they were appointed and how. It even managed to some how pierce the secrecy SCOTUS is known for to reveal how the voting on many of these important cases was managed and manipulated. I found the book fascinating as a review of the history of our country through the evolution of SCOTUS decisions. This is a somewhat long book and definitely not for the casual reader. In fact, if I have a criticism it is the inclusion at the beginning of a history of the 1787 Constitutional Convention. I cannot imagine anybody wanting to read this book that isn''t already sufficiently aware of that history. It was unnecessary. If the author felt that some case needed historical illumination from the convention then a couple of paragraphs when needed could have been added here and there. Another criticism or actually a disappointment is that the book ends during the Clinton administration in 1992 over 20 years ago. Hopefully, the author will update this very enjoyable treatment of the history of the Supreme Court before too long. On the whole I found this book more enlightening than any Con Law class I took in law school.
23 people found this helpful
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Gary Pilgrim
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
If you are a "We the People" disciple do not buy this book
Reviewed in the United States on August 20, 2019
This is a great book that tells the true story of the Constitution and the Supreme Court cases that helped shape it into a living document. However, if you are a gun toting "We the people" type you probably will not like it. If you read this book you will find that the... See more
This is a great book that tells the true story of the Constitution and the Supreme Court cases that helped shape it into a living document. However, if you are a gun toting "We the people" type you probably will not like it. If you read this book you will find that the founding fathers did not consider women, slaves or native Americans to be people. The people were the white landed gentry from little old England.
4 people found this helpful
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T. Walsh
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good history, horrific editing
Reviewed in the United States on May 19, 2020
The author''s knowledge of SCOTUS is unquestionable. However, as others have noted, grammar, spelling and other obvious errors on nearly every page, some so egregious as to change the ideas presented, make me wonder if the ebook version was created using voice recognition... See more
The author''s knowledge of SCOTUS is unquestionable. However, as others have noted, grammar, spelling and other obvious errors on nearly every page, some so egregious as to change the ideas presented, make me wonder if the ebook version was created using voice recognition software and a reader who spoke only broken English.
8 people found this helpful
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ZeddZull
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Interesting and readable - Kindle version is riddled with typographical errors
Reviewed in the United States on September 2, 2021
I have enjoyed reading this history of the Supreme Court. Irons has written a lively and informative history. I would have like to have gotten more of the legal history and a little less of the biographical details. He tends to be quite single-minded in focusing on a... See more
I have enjoyed reading this history of the Supreme Court. Irons has written a lively and informative history. I would have like to have gotten more of the legal history and a little less of the biographical details. He tends to be quite single-minded in focusing on a specific area of law in each era. Once he covers Marbury v. Madison, his is focused on the implications of the Court for slavery. Once he passes through Reconstruction, we are into labor law. He cherry-picks his topics to satisfy a specific point of view.

My biggest complaint is with the copyediting of the Kindle version. It has become a game to highlight every typo that I find. On average, I seem to find at least one per Kindle page. What started out as a distraction has become a game, which is not what I had in mind when I purchased the book.
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James E Fields
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
White supremacy at its best. The big lie !
Reviewed in the United States on September 9, 2021
Wow !! Peter Irons, should be celebrated and congratulated. Tackles the greatest story of American hypocritical jurisprudence. From the ideology of the so-called framers of the constitution of the United States of America. Who were slaveholders, and Master hypocrites of... See more
Wow !! Peter Irons, should be celebrated and congratulated. Tackles the greatest story of American hypocritical jurisprudence. From the ideology of the so-called framers of the constitution of the United States of America. Who were slaveholders, and Master hypocrites of Judeo-so called Christianity. This book should be a must read in every introductory Historical Black Colleges and Universities, and the so-called main stream university.(Schools of white supremacy).. Lastly he exposed some serious inhumane racists… Brother Peter Irons, you are true to the craft of the scales of justice.
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Lauren
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Do not buy the Kindle version
Reviewed in the United States on July 13, 2021
Like other reviewers mentioned the Kindle edition is atrocious. Not only are there typos and grammatical misplacements, entire clauses and sentences are missing as to make it almost impossible to read. Here’s a sample bastardized from Abigail Adams’ famous letter... See more
Like other reviewers mentioned the Kindle edition is atrocious. Not only are there typos and grammatical misplacements, entire clauses and sentences are missing as to make it almost impossible to read.

Here’s a sample bastardized from Abigail Adams’ famous letter to her husband:

“Do not put such unlimited power into the hands of care and attention is not paid to the ladies we are determined to foment a rebellion,”

The actual quote is: “Do not put such unlimited power into the hands of Husbands. Remember all Men would be tyrants if they could. If perticuliar care and attention is not paid to the Laidies we are determined to foment a Rebelion,”

As you can see the relevant deleted portion makes sense of the excerpt and changes the meaning. These errors are littered throughout and do a disservice to the author.
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Dark41
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This is not history
Reviewed in the United States on November 2, 2020
This book is titled as being history, but it is not history. The author uses the narrative to lecture about abstract legal ideas separated by decades or centuries from the material being treated in chapters. The narrative throughout smacks of political bias, and the... See more
This book is titled as being history, but it is not history. The author uses the narrative to lecture about abstract legal ideas separated by decades or centuries from the material being treated in chapters. The narrative throughout smacks of political bias, and the author comes off as incredibly condescending towards historical figures and reading audience alike. Clearly no one on the planet can ever be as smart as the author. The entire work lacks any conformity or consistency to any historical standard.
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A 2021 People's History of the outlet sale Supreme Court outlet online sale

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A 2021 People's History of the outlet sale Supreme Court outlet online sale

A 2021 People's History of the outlet sale Supreme Court outlet online sale

A 2021 People's History of the outlet sale Supreme Court outlet online sale

A 2021 People's History of the outlet sale Supreme Court outlet online sale

A 2021 People's History of the outlet sale Supreme Court outlet online sale

A 2021 People's History of the outlet sale Supreme Court outlet online sale